Re-wiring my dust collector


I am in the process of re-wiring my garage to add 220 for a new table saw. While I am at it I am wondering if I should re-wire my Penn State 1 1/2 hp dust collector for 220v operation. It is on a shared 110 v line now which I could wire as a dedicated 110 volt breaker handling only the collector. If it is on a dedicated 110v breaker of sufficent amperage is there any real advantage to changing it to 220 operation?
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Bob wrote: > I am in the process of re-wiring my garage to add 220 for a new table > saw. While I am at it I am wondering if I should re-wire my Penn State > 1 1/2 hp dust collector for 220v operation.
As a matter of practice, use the highest voltage available.
It reduces line losses, thus saving you money.
Lew
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Bob wrote:

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Bob wrote:

Bob
Listen and observe carefully when it starts up and runs on 110. Then wire it for 220 and compare the results. The you will be sold on 220.
Bob AZ
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on 120v, so there was no reason to rewire it. A real 1.5hp motor will draw 16a and will really benefit from being on 240v. Voltage drop will be reduced and the motor will last longer since it will not be starved on startup.
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I re-wired my PennState DC and bought a 220v LongRanger remote with no regrets. Higher voltage gives smoother motor starts, slightly more efficient operation.
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Dust collectors draw a lot of currrent during startup (typically something like 50-60A at 120V). Running at 240V will cut the current draw in half, which is generally a good thing, but don't expect to notice a difference in steady-state performance.
If you want to be scientific about it, measure the line voltage at the dust collector receptacle during startup and running. As long as the voltage stays at 110V or above, you're fine as is. If it's sagging below 110V, changing to 240V would be useful.
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