Re: Which has the better cordless 18v. drill: Bosch or Hitachi?

I just got a Hitachi cordless screwdriver and it looks like a great tool but haven't been using it long so cant say one way or another about Hitachi, although I think it will be ok. I do know that for many years I have been using the DeWalt 1/2 in drill driver(a little over $200 now in cost). It is reversible, has two main speeds and a tease trigger. Can be used as a hammerdrill too for masonry. There are 5 clutch settings. This tool is tough as nails, as are most Dewalt tools I know of that my friends use. You need at least two batteries and the 90 buck cost of their battery is a bit much. You can get off brand batteries that are LI ion for about half the price and I have found them to be better so far than the stock Dewalt battery. the only problem I have noticed so far on the tool is that there are small stress cracks developing where the case is screwed together near the screw holes. I did not find this to detract from the performance of the tool. I am very impressed by Dewalt products in general.
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don paolino
"KMoiarty" < snipped-for-privacy@shaw.ca> wrote in message
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Might not be a bad idea to reinforce those cracks. Are they growing? Maybe a bit of wicking CA
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desperado wrote:

I don't see the original post, so I'm responding to it here.
Any decent brand of cordless tool is going to be good these days. Hitachi, Bosch, deWalt, Makita all work.
Each brand does some things that are outstanding and others that are just OK. For example Makita's lithium ion 18v impact driver has the others scrambling to catch up.
But the thing to do is look at the _system_. Life is a lot easier if every tool you have uses the same battery, and ultimately it's cheaper as well because you can add to the system with bare tools intead of full sets with battery and charger. And eventually you very likely will accumulate tools, so it's best IMO to buy into the system with the widest range.
By chance my first cordless was a deWalt 18v hammer drill. So far it's been working fine--haven't really been beating on it but haven't been babying it either. I've added other 18v deWalt tools over time and they've all been fine as well. The battery packs seem expensive but you can usually find them 2 for a hundred bucks which is a pretty good saving over the single unit price. The latest from them is that they have 18v lithium ion batteries that fit most of their existing 18v tools (and the price has already dropped 40 bucks on them apparently). That said, if I needed a tool that wasn't part of the deWalt range I'd not hesitate to go with a different brand.
I'm not really sure who has the most extensive range at this time--so far everything I've needed I've found from deWalt.

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--John
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Bosch, Hitachi, Makita, Milwaukee, Dewalt, Porter Cable or Panasonic (did I leave anybody out?) but NOT Ryobi, Craftsman, Skil or Black & Decker. Find the one in the first group that feels best in your hand, has the best balance etc. Buy that one. I was impressed with the black & white 18 Volt Makita I picked up the other day, but it was $200. The pro-quality tools will all do a fine job for you. Don't agonize too much over the decision because this won't be the last cordless drill you buy. You won't be passing this one down to your grandchildren. Batteries die. Some last longer than others, but they all die. I never got more than about 6 years of good service from one. I've got two perfectly good drill motors hanging on my wall hoping that someday I run across a good deal on batteries for them. Two new batteries (if you can still get them by the time the old ones die) cost almost as much as an entire kit with drill, charger and two of the newest gee-whiz batteries that are smaller, lighter, more powerful and promise to last a gazillion cycles. There's always a new technology around the corner. So, you buy a new kit and hang on to the old one hoping that someday you'll run across a good deal on batteries for it.
DonkeyHody "In theory, theory and practice are the same, but in practice they are not."
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D:
I'm not seeing the original post either. Some random thoughts include mention that the Hitachi replacement parts are expensive. Not having repaired a Dewalt, it's for you to make further comparison.
CA glues are good but don't like freezing temperatures. But if you can get them to wick into tight cracks and don't have to deal with cold weather, it's worth a try. If the cracks are gapped and you are wary of crack acceleration, you could also open the case, roughen the plastic and put a thin film of JB Weld over and into the stressed area as reinforcement, making sure you don't interfere with case reassembly.
You might try putting a washer of some sort under the case screw heads if you have room. It would be interesting to see if there is any commentary from experience on the relative value of differing kinds. A replaceable rubber or teflon washer might help with dampening the vibration and would fit where hard counterparts would not.
Regards,
Edward Hennessey
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I just bought my hubby a 1/2" Ridgid. It came with two batteries and the charger and it's a torquie lil thing. Lifetime warranty too, which is one of the reasons I chose it. The other reason is that hubs is getting a little arthritus in his front paws and I hoped the lighter one would put less srain on him. For me it was a choice between the Milwaulkee and the Ridgid. The Milwaulkee has a bigger battery.
I have a number of Ridgid tools and all have been very reliable. So far (knock on wood) have never had a problem with any of them. The one drawback I have read in the reviews is that if it is under heavy, constant use that the batteries only last about 30 minutes. If it's for just around the house or in a workshop I think it would be one to consider along with the Milwaulkee. The Milwaulkee has a bigger battery. Takes longer to charge and discharge. I have a little Milwaulkee screw gun that I have used the hell out of over the last (guessing) ten years and it has just been a little workhorse. They are definitely top notch tools.
Kate
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