Re: What is it? XLIX

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Just guesses of course, but...
272. Some sort of screen door fastener. Maybe to hold the glass or screen in place?
273. Sprinkler pipe clamp.
274. I would guess at an old chaulk or ink dispenster for carpenters, etc.
277. Cheap but effective "nut" for use on fiber board or soft woods with light duty carriage bolts, etc. Digs into the wood as you tighten the fastener and thus does not spin?
Regards, Joe Agro, Jr. http://www.autodrill.com http://www.multi-drill.com
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Or glue applicator

Actually called a "teenut," (works similarly to real teenuts for clamping workpieces for machining, but in wood or plastic to mount various positioning aids) Use a lot of them making custom wheelchair rehab seating.
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wrote:

Could be

Yes, tee nut is the answer that I was looking for here.
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XLIX? Am I misreading this? If you're going for "19" then it should be written, "XIX". Otherwise it's speld Exlax.
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I am sure others will point out that the Roman numeral L stands for 50 XL would give 40 XLIX would give 49
But inquiring minds would like to know if IL would work?
(top posted for your convenience) ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Keep the whole world singing . . . . DanG (remove the sevens) snipped-for-privacy@7cox.net

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On Thu, 17 Feb 2005 13:21:21 -0600, DanG wrote:

There are those who say that it's bad form to subtract anything but the next lower "denomination" from a given symbol, i.e., XL, 40 plus IX, 9, gives 49. But you can't do VL for 45 or IL for 49. I think XC works for 90, but not IC for 99 or VC for 95.
But I'm pretty sure that that's mostly a "school of thought", as opposed to a hard-and-fast rule.
BTW, I know what 272 and 277 are, but am afraid to guess on any of the others, except that 273 looks like a holder of some kind for something round. Maybe a bipod for a boresight scope or something.
Cheers! Rich
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Rich Grise wrote:

I've always wanted to see a step by step example of how a long division problem with a couple of "not too easy" numbers is solved in the Roman numeral system. Can someone show me/us one?
The ancient Hebrew numeral system is even simpler as only addition is needed to determine the full value, there's no subtraction of lower denominations located to the left of higher ones. If interested, see:
http://www.answers.com/topic/hebrew-numerals
Jeff
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*First* you figure out how to do multiplication. <grin> (note: multiplying by *five* or *ten* is easy -- all you do is 'change the letters'; multiplying by anything else is *messy*. e.g., what's "IV * XL"?)
Division is done by 'multiply and subtract'. and 'summing' the various multiplicands that you end up using..
Note: some of this stuff was *easier* with 'early Roman' numbering -- which did *not* have the concept of the 'prefixed' symbol for a 'negative'. The _position_ of a symbol simply *DID*NOT*MATTER*. IIIXVLCC meant exactly the same thing as CCLXVII. this made for "simplified" addition -- you could just concatenate the two numbers. Or, if feeling fancy, sort the symbols by 'magnitude', and replace 'excess' occurrences of any particular symbol with a single occurrence of a larger-magnitude symbol. repeat until no further reductions were possible. Example:
IIII * XXXX = XXXX + XXXX + XXXX + XXXX => XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX => LLLX => CLX
Division is _relatively_ straightforward in 'early' numbering. It is fairly simple to find the largest 'power of ten' (or 5 times a power of 10) of the divisor that is smaller than the dividend. This is, after all, just a 'shift the characters', operation. So, you subtract that value. and repeat as needed. Note: you'll never have to subtract the same value more than 4 times, so the process is _not_ all that onerous.
With "late" Roman numerals, I strongly suspect that division was accomplished by first 're-writing' in 'old style', doing the division, and 'reducing' the result.
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On Thu, 17 Feb 2005 17:51:59 -0500, Jeff Wisnia wrote:

When I was a kid, there was a series of books either by Time-Life or Bell Labs/Disney or something, with all kinds of interesting scientific stuff. In the volume on numbers, there's a cartoon of a guy trying to do long division in Roman numerals. ISTR that after filling up a whole page (like filling up a whole blackboard in a comic strip) the guy gives up. :-)

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<snip>

Hey, I can get a pic of one of those on a large lathe at work.
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That would be great, I would like to see it.
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On Fri, 18 Feb 2005 04:51:28 -0500, Mark and Kim Smith wrote:

There's also one on one of the lathes where I work. But in the pic #275, the points didn't look like wheels to me, and it doesn't fasten down.
http://www.neodruid.net/images/lathe_thing_1.jpg
http://www.neodruid.net/images/lathe_thing_2.jpg
The background is all dark, because the shop is shut down for the night.
But you can see the source of my confusion! :-)
Cheers! Rich
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    [ ... ]

    Yep! What you photographed is a steady rest, not a lathe dog. It is intended to have telescoping arms extend out of the three arms shown at 120 degree intervals. The knobs on the end of the arms extend the inner ones to contact the workpiece and support it on center as it rotates.
    The lathe dog shown in the puzzle clamps onto the workpiece with the square-headed screw, and a pin from the faceplate fits between the two legs to rotate the workpiece with the spindle while it is supported between centers.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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Oooops. You, of course, are right. My brain was telling me the L was 5 for some reason...
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I've been going to a web site that translates to and from roman numerals, since they are kind of tricky if you don't use them very much.
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272: miniature robot splint
273: guardian from "City on the Gates of Forever."
274: home enima kit
275: Captain Hook's first prosthetic, when he was "ensign funny-hand."
276: Arnold Schwarzenegger's Terminator eyepiece
277: Captain Hook's second prosthetic, when he was "liuetenant sprinkler-attachment"
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Hehe, I like those answers. Website needs a section for "Answers" and a section for "Better Answers." (:
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272--Sliding door or window stop 273--Lathe dog 274--Pin striping device 275--Hand launcher for trap shooting 276--Iris diaphragm for camera lens 277--Tee nut
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Correct
Still awaiting good links to verify these two

All correct.
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The tip of the bolt is actually a little bit convex, and the bolt is not very long so I don't think it's a nutcracker.
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