Re: What is it? CXX


"Voltes34" wrote: It's more like 63.5 ! ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Brian's screen may have a little parallax.
So, my guess is it's an up-side-down barometer.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
696: A weapon, intended not to look like one.
697: A model of the human heart held together with baling wire and string.
--
There's no such thing as a free lunch, but certain accounting practices can
result in a fully-depreciated one.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If it were a stamp, wouldn't the numbers be backwards?
--
There's no such thing as a free lunch, but certain accounting practices can
result in a fully-depreciated one.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That's what they are.
Nick
--
The modular DRO
Available now in USA / Canada
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

    They *are*. The stamps are on the ends of the arms. What is cast into the hub's front (and probably the back as well) is a *label* to tell you which arm to use. I do find it unusual that the labels are oriented so the active arm will be pointing *up*, suggesting either that the device is intended for stamping numbers in the underside of something, or that the (supposed) labels on the handle side of the hub may be more usefully oriented.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
--
Email: < snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
(too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
It's the vernier on an analytical balance. The gold chain hanging off the edge is a dead give-away. Paul K. Dickman

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

wheels
is
by
dropping
along
trolley
the
where
on
man
Thanks for the info, I knew the general use of it but not the details.
Rob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You're welcome.
--
Nahmie
The only road to success is always under construction.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

What about the slots on the back end, I was hoping someone would know what they are for. A friend of mine suggested that they could be used to straighten fins on old radiators.
Rob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
R.H. wrote:

I think the fuel-caps he has in mind have 1 large (or 2 smaller) tabs sticking up that would go into the slots.
Dave
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

    As I suggested earlier -- fuel caps with a bent up rib intended to be gripped by the hand, but sometimes requiring more torque than is comfortable without a handle like #696.
    I seem to even remember seeing radiator caps with a similar rib as a handle.
    The screwdriver end would handle one style of Dzus fasteners, and the semi-circular projection when the screwdriver blade is folded would handle the other common style.
    So I think that the identification as "preflight tool" is probably right. It accounts for all of the features that I noticed.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
--
Email: < snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
(too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
DoN. Nichols wrote:

    As you say, many older aircraft had simple caps like radiator caps, with metal angles welded to the top. One leg of the angle provided a grip for opening the cap, and also gave visual indication that the cap was fully locked closed. If the cap was streamlined, it was closed. If not, it wasn't.     The tool is a bit oversize for the small caps, but works well on them. Some aircraft had much larger caps, 4"-5" across, with a hinged tab on top. They were generally covered by an access door. They were harder to open and close, so the tool really helped.     Dzus fasteners came in several head styles; common slotted, coin slotted (two different sizes here, thus the two rounded bits on the tool) and wings, like a wing nut. The slots on the back were useful for opening the wing-type fasteners if they were balky. Dzus fasteners were often balky.     Many small aircraft, older ones especially, have small trim tabs riveted to the trailing edges of various control surfaces. If bent correctly, these tabs will allow for straight and level flight hands-off. The slot in the back is also handy for tweaking those tabs.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

what
That makes sense, thanks to all who replied to my question.
Rob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.