Re: Update from an old friend



And you should work on hanging out here more. I miss your comments.
Merry Christmas.
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There are woodworkers whose pieces inspire us.
There are authors of woodworking books, videos and DVDs.
There are hands on teachers of woodworking skills and techniques.
And there are people who ascribe to "Be good to each other. Help when you can. Try and leave the place a little better than you found it."
Then there's the all too rare combination of all of those characteristics.
You sir, are definitely one of those rare combinations.
Thank you for demonstrating that it can be done - and maybe getting some of us to try and follow your example - even just a little.
charlie b
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charlie b wrote: Kind words snipped.

Hey Charlie, It is nice to see you in the rec. Merry Christmas and holidays of all kinds. Best wishes in the coming year!
Doug
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Sat, Dec 23, 2006, 8:44pm (EST-3) snipped-for-privacy@arkansas.net (DougStowe) waves and says from the boondocks: Hey, wood wreckers. I used to hang out with you a lot so I hope it is OK to drive by <snip>
Hi ya Doug. Merry season.
JOAT It's not hard, if you get your mind right. - Granny Weatherwax
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Theo, I found a can of bright yellow spray paint in my cabinet and thought of you. It is nice to see you in the rec. Merry Christmas and Happy New year to you as well!
Doug
J T wrote:

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Sun, Dec 24, 2006, 7:34pm (EST-3) snipped-for-privacy@arkansas.net (DougStowe) doth sayeth: Theo, I found a can of bright yellow spray paint in my cabinet <snip>
I've been trying some of the spray can latex, yellow of course, and it seems to work at least as well as the regular stuff, even tho a tad more pricey. Certainly smells better anyway. Should look real nice on some of your boxes. LMAO Wave when you drive by if you can't stop/.
JOAT It's not hard, if you get your mind right. - Granny Weatherwax
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Theo, what grit should I sand to before using the latex yellow spray on my boxes? I've never done that before and might want to try it. If I can't find the latex, do you think the stuff I have in the cabinet already would work?
Doug
J T wrote:

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Mon, Dec 25, 2006, 6:50pm (EST-3) snipped-for-privacy@arkansas.net (DougStowe) doth query: Theo, what grit should I sand to before using the latex yellow spray on my boxes? I've never done that before and might want to try it. If I can't find the latex, do you think the stuff I have in the cabinet already would work?
Very technical process, but I'm sure you can handle it. Go from coarse to fine, of course. Get the coarsest you can find, you know the type, coarse gravel size. Give it a once over, for that rustic texture. Then you go direct to the finest grit you can find. No sense in wasting too much time changine sandpaper needlesly. Hit it a time or two with that. Wipe the sawdust off, then hit it with the spray can. Latex, or regular, doesn't really matter, for the market you'll be aiming for. From what I've seen at some of the flea markets and in the magazines, two years of these, and you'll be able to retire to Tahaiti, no prob.
Actually, a bit back I redid my .22 "squirrel rifle", again. Wound up mixing a recipe for rust color, using latex paint, and painted the stock. 'Speerminting again. Came out quite nice. But I had some paint left over, and decided to 'speermint again. Thinned the paint way out with water, and applied it as what I would call a "wash", but went on like a stain, on a piece of test scrap. Came out very nice, translucent, and a more pleasing shade. I'll be doing a bit more experimenting along these same lines, but it seems to be as good, maybe better, then the stains I've used; certainly less expensive, easy cleanup, etc. Definitely gives the option of custom colors. You might want to try it on some scrap and check it out. So far I'm happy with the results.
JOAT It's not hard, if you get your mind right. - Granny Weatherwax
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Theo, I think we are on the same wavelength. I've been doing some "rustic" boxes using a rotary chisel in a roto-zip to develop the texture, then lightly sanding with fine paper. On one I used two colors of milk paint, yellow underlayer, red on top, then sanded lightly through the overlayer. It just goes to show that in making boxes, anything goes. You made a good point. Experiment. Don't take my word or anyone else's word for it, just do it. If it comes out looking like crap, at least it is your crap, you didn't have to buy it at Walmart, no one else in their right mind will have one like it, nor will they be inclined to steal yours.
I feel the milk paint may be a bit more artsy than the spray. That allows me to charge more for the finished box. I also like it because you don't have to breath it.
Doug
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Thu, Dec 28, 2006, 7:33pm (EST-3) snipped-for-privacy@arkansas.net (DougStowe) doth sayeth: Theo, I think we are on the same wavelength. I've been doing some "rustic" boxes using a rotary chisel in a roto-zip to develop the texture, then lightly sanding with fine paper. On one I used two colors of milk paint, yellow underlayer, red on top, then sanded lightly through the overlayer. It just goes to show that in making boxes, anything goes. You made a good point. Experiment. Don't take my word or anyone else's word for it, just do it. If it comes out looking like crap, at least it is your crap, you didn't have to buy it at Walmart, no one else in their right mind will have one like it, nor will they be inclined to steal yours. I feel the milk paint may be a bit more artsy than the spray. That allows me to charge more for the finished box. I also like it because you don't have to breath it.
Uh, Doug, you do know I wasn't serious in that first paragraph, don't you? And, I don't use spray paint on anything wood. That said, I think if I wanted to "texture" wood I'd probably try a wire brush in a drill.
I've not been real thrilled with my milk paint tries. I'll probably give it another shot some other time tho. But, in the meantime the thinned latex has been working out nicely - doesn't smell bad wither. A plus is, if I run out late at night, I can always hit a Wally-World and get a can. I'm thinking now the thinned latex would start looking more like paint, rather than stain, if I use multiple coats. I can think of at least one application were that could be very handy. It also dries to the touch quickly.
This all started mostly from me wanting to get away from stuff needing nasty stuff to thin or cleanup. I've been trying thinned (hanf & half) Titebond II, and some Elmer's, as finish. So far that seems to be working out quite well, seems to be at least as good as water based poly - so far. The Elmer's dries clear, and I'd been afraid the Titebond would dry slsightly yellowish, but it seems to be clear. I think I'm a bit happier with the Titebond, all considered.
By the way, I've bene happy with my tea stain experiments too.
I tried shoe polish finish some time back. Turtle polish worked nice, but seems to be off the market now. Kiwi polish was OK, but seemed to pick up dirt, which the Turtle didn't. Now I just use Johnson's paste wax.
Experimenting is always fun, at times a bit frustrating, but always a learning experimence.
Have a happy.
Later.
JOAT It's not hard, if you get your mind right. - Granny Weatherwax
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