RE: Timber Polish


The following was given to me by a guy in OZ whose father had given it to him.
Never tried it, but some of you finishing gurus might want to comment. ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
WHITEYS TIMBER POLISH
Part One.
Sand up to 400-600 grade paper & rub with 0000 steel wool. Mix equal parts of raw tung oil, boiled linseed oil & satin poly-urethane. Rub oil mix into timber with clean, soft cloth. Rub well in & then remove all excess oil with clean cloth. Repeat this 3-4 times.
Part Two.
Mix equal parts of raw tung oil & boiled linseed oil in a small pot & place inside a larger pot. Pour water into the larger pot until half way up the outsides of the smaller pot. Then place onto hot plate & heat up the oil mix slowly. When warm, place a handful of shredded beeswax into the oils, & when all the wax has melted, remove from heat. Stir until cooled (usually takes 2 beers) & then keep this creamy mix in a air tight jar. This will keep indefinately.
Rub this into timber 3-6 times (depends on project) & make sure you remove all excess oil. This method of polishing furniture dates back to the 18th century & was handed down to me by my Father (Master Craftsman). Remember to soak all oily rags in water after use, as they can self combust, (& burn down the bloody workshop). This polish will repel water, red wine, coffee & hot plate stains. It gives the most warm, earthy, touching feel to anything you will ever see. It invites people to touch your furniture, as nature intended.
Any queries ? ring or Email me. Only too pleased to pass on this wonderful finish.
Warm regards. Gary White.

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So, Minwax Wipe-on Poly followed for reasons unknown by a gummy soft wax instead of carnauba.
Blokes liked beeswax, but then again they had butlers to constantly polish the furniture....
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On Thu, 29 Dec 2005 06:16:25 GMT, with neither quill nor qualm, Lew

--snip--
No guru here, just an obstinate and highly opinionated wooddorker. I like it, but I prefer Waterlox. It takes those many steps and days of hard work, then distills them into several short coats which can be deglossed by using a scotchbrite or 0000 steel wool pad coated with Jwax. Both have a hand (feel of the wood) ta die for with the original color of the wood exposed, as nature intended.
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Seems the second part of the formula is worth looking into. I believe it is the formula that Sam Maloof uses on his rockers. He likes it for the repairabililty, and ease of touch up, and the satin sheen it leaves. I don't think he does any other surface prep though, just puts it on warm.
Robert
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I use part one. I typically mix in some mineral spirits to help penetration on the first two coats. I also sand with 600 grit W/D when applying. This type of mixture is sold under many names like Danish oil. Mixing your own is simple and can save lots of money.
I've never tried the wax thing. Sound like something James Krenov uses. If it's good enough for him, it might be worth trying.
MB
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