RE: Table Saw Zero Clearance Inserts

My son tipped me off to a very nifty T/S splitter From Micro Jig.
It requires that you fabricate a new zero clearance insert which is NBD, IMHO.
Included was a you-tube clip showing a method that uses the table saw, a band saw and some rare earth magnets used during fit-up.
Now there have got to be at least a dozen ways to make a ZCI for a 10" T/S, but one involving some 1/4" hardboard, some double backed tape, a router with a 1/2" pattern bit is about as straight forward as you can get, IMHO.
Throw in a 3/4" forstner bit to drill finger holes, a pilot drill and a tap for set screw adjusters, and you're done.
If you really want to spiffy things up, first make a pattern from a piece of 1/2" MDF using the metal insert supplied with the saw.
Cut out some hardboard blanks 1/4" oversize in length and width and tape together in blocks of three (3) to yield 3/4" blanks.
If I had one, a scroll saw would simplify making the MDF pattern, otherwise it's router time.
How do other people make ZCI for their T/S?
Lew
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Actually you do not have to fabricate a zero clearance insert, I just used the store bought one that I has been using for years. The steel reinforced splitter works very well however. Don't get the all plastic version if those are still available.
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On 12/13/14, 10:20 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

I use my original insert (Unisaw) as a router pattern template DS taped to an oversized 1/2" blank. I think I have several wraps of tape arount the original insert edge to tighten up the fit of my replacements. I currently drill/tap for leveling set screws but this gets old. Next time I'll try hot melt glue on the table saw tabs (pre waxed) and position the new insert until the glue sets. This should be much faster. As far as materials, I've tried oak, melamine PB, and baltic birch PW. The oak begins to splinter away where the saw teeth beat down (the critical area). I might try orienting the grain perpendicular to the blade next time. The melamine works better, but suffers the same fate as the oak. The PW works best. At some point I may try aluminum for my mitering since this involves hundreds of cuts with a specialized setup and the wood inserts often need changing out during the production run to maintain 'perfection'. I have the Micro Jig insert doohickey but never have gotten around to installing it.
-BR
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+1
The plastic versions break easily. Note that there is a set for fine tuning the offset from the blade. I much prefer a real splitter or knife, though. I haven't used my MJ splitter since I got the Delta splitter/plaws, thing (though it has its issues too).
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On 12/14/2014 4:24 PM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

+1 ;~) I have not used my MJ splitters since I started using my riving knife on my SS.
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