RE: T/S Inertia

Page 5 of 9  

"dpb" wrote:

--------------------------------------- They do if you include the rest of the T/S instruction which includes hand placement, use of push blocks, standing location when starting to feed stock for cutting, how to finish cut with hands in a clear position which includes insuring the saved piece clears the back of the table (Yes, a run out table is req'd).
Basically, insure that you stay away from the blade when it is above the table top.
Lew
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Which we can safely discount as being 100% successful. I too wonder about their insurance. Perhaps you can ask them.
--
Never underestimate the stupidity of a know-it-all.


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"Lobby Dosser" wrote:

---------------------------
They put an average of 500 students per year thru WMT101 (Basic req'd course to take any advanced courses) which in and of itself is quite a statement.
The lawyers and the insurance gods have long ago put holy water on this program which just gets bigger every year.
Lew
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Why do the lawyers and insurance folks deem it good?
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"Lobby Dosser" wrote:

---------------------------------------- I'm reminded of an old time baseball player named "Wee Willy Keeler" who when asked why he was such a successful hitter responded, ".. cause I hit em where they ain't.
The course is built around prevention.
If you don't stay focused, "SHIT HAPPENS", so address it head on.
How you address the saw.(Where do you stand and how?)
How you set the blade height for the task at hand.
Is the splitter /W/ pawls properly installed to prevent kick back?
Where do you place your hands to keep the stock down on the table and against the fence?
Are your eyes focused on the fence to insure the stock stays in contact with the fence?
Has your left hand been placed behind your back at the proper time?
Is the correct push stick in the right location and readily available, if req'd?
The list goes on, but the idea is to train your body to perform SAFE motions in the proper sequence almost automatically. Think "Wax On, "Wax Off".
. Lew
.
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

All I do is turn off the saw. I was making up a railing for a friend just yesterday and putting on the dado blade. He said don't you pull the cord... I don't. Never saw a light, appliance or power tool go on by itself. He said what if someone turns in on by accident? I said that would have to be me, and if I'm that freaking dumb, I deserve to lose an arm. I'm sure a switch has gone on by itself at least once somewhere, but in well over half a million hours of experience, I've not witnessed it, I asked him if he ever witnessed same, he said no, so thats well over one million hours of testing... so I live on the edge...
Geez, no guard, no splitter, no disconnect... Thrill a minute...
--
Jack
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Keeps life interesting.
Max
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wrote:
It keeps you paying attention to what you're doing.
Dina is a guardless, gaping, disconnect-free gal, too. I guess I'll be the first here to try out Grizz' G0715.
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I've seen some things turn on by themselves, or more likely *not* turn on. Usually what happened is the switch is either not in a full off position or defective. The switch not being in a full off position is difficult on most of the power tools I've used.
Now some of these modern computers... Those stupid things turn on when power is connected.
Puckdropper
--
Never teach your apprentice everything you know.

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I have seen iron filings bridge the contacts and energize a circuit in a larger wall switch.
"Puckdropper" <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote in message
I've seen some things turn on by themselves, or more likely *not* turn on. Usually what happened is the switch is either not in a full off position or defective. The switch not being in a full off position is difficult on most of the power tools I've used.
Now some of these modern computers... Those stupid things turn on when power is connected.
Puckdropper
--
Never teach your apprentice everything you know.



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"Puckdropper" <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote

I am on the fence on this subject. I have never seen one turn on by itself. I have seen some tools turn on because the switch is easy to bump. I have seen things turned on because someone else turned them on by mistake.
I guess I almost always unplug while making any adjustment or tool change where body parts will be very close or in contact with the sharp rotating things.
The exception is that for a quick change while I am alone on the table saw, which has a magnetic starter. I can't see how that could ever turn on by itself.
--
Jim in NC



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The very time when you need somebody around in case you bleed out.

Which tools should have, as they cannot start if they were shut down due to a power failure and the power is restored. No foul if the TV comes back on, but power tools are a whole other story.
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Have you ever seen the extension cord type device that is sold for tools without magnetic starters to guard against exactly the thing you just mentioned?
If not, or for those unaware, it is a section of cord with a box with a brain inline that allows a tool with a regular mechanical switch to operate normally, until the power to the tool is interupted, either by the plug getting bumped, the main power cutting out, or a tripped breaker or fault protector. At that point, even if the power is out only for an instant, the tool will not be given power back by the brain box, until a reset button on the brain it pressed.
Not nearly as expensive as magnetic starters, easy to use, and give another layer of safety. Plus, it satisfies the requirements that may apply to a shop that is inspected by OSHA or insurance inspectors. Some products are GFCI's that require pressing the reset button before it will come back on after power is interupted, and some only mimic a magnetic starter. Seems as though it was in the mid 30 dollar price range, when I looked at them a couple years ago.
--
Jim in NC



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wrote

Thanks, good to know and I'll google it as soon as I can think of what to search for.
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On Wed, 11 Aug 2010 02:58:30 -0700, "Lobby Dosser"

Nevahoiduvit, neither.

"Extension-cord-with-magnetic-starter-built-in", perhaps? ;O
"inline mag starter" maybe?
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wrote

You got good results from those?
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On Wed, 11 Aug 2010 21:40:01 -0700, "Lobby Dosser"

Nope, I didn't try either that day. What'd you find? Anything?
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wrote

Nothing
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wrote

I found this brand, but I think they are all GFCI's, too. I have found that using a GFCI on top of a GFCI protected like can sometimes lead to excessive false resets.
I will keep looking for a little while, but there is one type. Just find a dealer and you are all set.
--
Jim in NC



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Oh, I think I would stick with the GFCE with a manual reset, for this price. http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/UL-Restart-Protection-Cord-3KUZ7?Pid=search
I sent a reply to the poster, instead of the group earlier by mistake. Here is that message with a link.
found this brand, but I think they are all GFCI's, too. I have found that using a GFCI on top of a GFCI protected like can sometimes lead to excessive false resets.
I will keep looking for a little while, but there is one type. Just find a dealer and you are all set.
I forgot the link the first time. http://tools.passandseymour.com/psgfci/downloads/PortableGFCI_bro.pdf
--
Jim in NC



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