RE: T/S Inertia

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I have been taking a basic wood working at a local community college.
As you would expect, there is a heavy emphasis on safety.
They have a collection of table saws including General, Delta Unisaw and PM66.
Over the years there have been a few T/S accidents.
Analyzing these accidents revealed the following:
1) The majority of accidents involved the PM66.
2) After shutting off, the PM66 required 20-30 seconds more to come to a rest than either the General or Unisaw.
Looking at the saw blade, it was very difficult to see if the blade was still spinning.
You had to literally "feel" the blade still turning by touching the table.
Those of you who have a PM66 are aware of this phenomena; however, if you buy a PM66, be aware.
A PM66 is NOT the same as the General or the Unisaw.
BTW: These saws were all equipped with Biesemeyer fences.
Strong like bull, but give me a Unifence anyday.
Lew
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wrote:

The only time I've ever come close to getting bitten by my Unisaw was exactly this. A blade brake would be a great addition to any table saw.

Never used a Unifence, so can't say whether I'd like it better or not. Why?
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Strange, I had a PM66 and didn't feel it took that long to coast down. I'm not disagreeing- just commenting. It sure was a great saw and once adjusted with the TS Aligner, it stayed that way.
Nonny
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"Nonnymus" wrote:

------------------------------- If your saw is a stand alone device, you become aclimated to it; however, if you have a shop with a PM66 AND say a Unisaw, it could be a problem. ---------------------------------

-------------------------------------- 1) No need for a separate stop block and clamp. 2) Can quickly move fence to either side of the blade as req'd. 3) If you mount a 1.5" thick sacrifical fence, you can use existing calibrated tape measure directly without making a separate calibration.
Lew

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wrote:

Explain please.

Huh? The Beisemeyer moves pretty quickly.

Ok. I don't use the tape measure. I have one of the Wixey gauges, and still check it off a tooth.
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Take a look at one to understand what I am about to explain. ;~) The Unifence fence slides left, right, forward, and backward. Because you can slide it backwards the end near the back of the saw table can be situated in front of the blade.

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No gots.

Oh, that makes perfect sense. <sheesh>
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On 8/9/2010 5:20 PM, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

The fence is an extruded aluminum channel that attaches to the carrier with bolts secured by large wing nuts. By simply loosening the wing nuts you can adjust the fence towards you or away from you. This is very handy when you need to cross-cut something with the miter gauge; slide the fence towards you so that the far end is in front of the blade (prevents the cutoff from being trapped between the fence and the blade), use the fence scale to set the cutoff distance, register the end of the workpiece against the fence, then push through the blade with the miter gauge.
More clearer?
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On Mon, 09 Aug 2010 18:37:26 -0500, Steve Turner

Much better. Thanks.
Sounds like it's a bitch keep aligned.
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Not mine. I check it before any significant project and It very rarely needs any adjusting. Why would it?
Max
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Aluminum. Wingnuts. Sliding. All these things scream "alignment" to me.
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Not really. The aluminum part that moves is up against the heavy casting that is the part that securely locks to the saw. Once you have the casting set, the aluminum repeats accurately (it is metal on metal with nothing to let it become inaccurate) when it is tightened against the casting.
I usually keep mine accuratly adjusted to under a 32nd of an inch, and it stays there for a long period of time. It takes something hitting it really hard to knock it out of adjustment.
I don't understand people that get out a tape measure to check their setting for every single cut. I set up my machine and scale to cut what I set it on, and go to town. If I really need a super accurate cut, I check the setting with a trial cut on a scrap. It is nearly always what I had the scale set on.
--
Jim in NC



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wrote

What he said but 1/32 of an inch is not close enough for me. Tape measure? ACK! I use a dial gauge *very* rarely but I have a rule that's marked in 64ths and I expect the fence to be *on the money*.
Max
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*snip*

I don't trust my fence indicator. I had it set correctly once, but as the saw got moved around, the rails (where the indicator is) on the saw moved as well. It's so much easier to get the tape out and adjust the fence than to try to keep the indicator reading true.
Puckdropper
--
Never teach your apprentice everything you know.

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On 10 Aug 2010 03:40:18 GMT, Puckdropper <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote:

I've never trusted the fence indicator. I put a Wixey gauge on mine and it seems to be pretty good. Once a session I zero it against the blade and all seems to be well.
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On 08/09/2010 10:51 PM, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

I absolutely trust the Unifence indicator, sometimes down to a 1/64" and it never fails me. I zero it to the blade maybe once a year; I can't recall it ever needing adjusting...
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snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

I retro fitted a new Delta fence to my 1954 Delta saw. The tape that is on it is out of wack and would need replaced to be of any use. I've been thinking of buying a new adhesive tape for around 10 bucks, but figure I've been measuring the fence with a tape forever, so haven't bothered. I just looked up the Wixey gauge and it looks great... but...$100 is way too much for me... Rockler has sticky tape on sale for under $3.00, Kreg sells tape for $10.
BTW, my fence only locks on the front bar, the back bar only stops it from lifting up. I use the back bar to hold my out feed table. Works great, really really great compared to the original fence that did lock front and back.
--
Jack
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I don't trust the front rail and indicator. The tolerance stack is just too deep. Before I bought the Wixey I measured from a tooth (still do quite often). Money spent on these things is obviously a personal matter.

I have no rear bar (one of the weaknesses of the Biesemeyer fence, IMO). OTOH, I can see why they don't lock front and back. The second latch adds another source of error.
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Snip
I have no rear bar (one of the weaknesses of the Biesemeyer fence, IMO). OTOH, I can see why they don't lock front and back. The second latch adds another source of error.
What is wrong with your Beisemeyer fence? Seriousely, there must be something wrong if you can not rely on it to give you repeatable set ups unless it is mounted on a marginal saw.
I have been using a Jet cabinet saw with a Biese clone the Jet exacta fence for about 11 years now and for the first time last week I had to actually reset the curser, it was out 1/64".
Again seriousely you absolutely should be able to depend on a Biesemeysr fence rule setting and or any clone.
Now if you think I may simply be happy with cloce, think again. Swingman and I gang up on building high end kitchens. I but the sheets of plywood for all the cabinet panels, he cuts and assembles the face frames complete with dado's. My panels must fit in his dado in all of the face frames. We have never had a problem. He uses a Unifence and has no issues with truste either. Basically both of our saws must be calibrated identically.
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Nothing is wrong with it. I'd rather have something to hold down the back of the fence, is all. No, I don't trust the measure on the front. Haven't on any saw. Been burned. I guess it could be the blade thickness, too. I've never bothered to track it down. It's easier to measure off the tooth and the Wixey makes that unnecessary.

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