RE: Squaring Rough Lumber

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:> >I have here a planer/thicknesser. The top is an Aluminium bed with a :> >slot running across it at right angles, through which blades protrude :> >which rotate at high speed. I pass timber along the bed and the blades :> >remove wood, flatening the timber - hopefully! That's a planer. :> In the USA, we call that a jointer. : Reading this group for quite a while now, I had always assumed the term : referred to some some sort of machine for cutting various joints in : wood. That's what the name suggests.
:> And the wood that we use for cabinetmaking, we call "lumber". "Timber", :> here, means standing trees which will eventually become lumber. :> "Timber" is also used, less frequently, to refer to very large wooden :> beams. : Timber: : "(n) wood suitable for building or carpentry whether growing or : cut, a beam or large piece of wood in a framework, as of a house, ship &c" : : Lumber: : "(n) Furniture stored away out of use: anything cumbersome or : useless"
: Yes, I have become accustomed to the (mis-)use of these words round here.
If you had read the full page at the OED from which you got that definition, you'd have seen the first specific North American definition, listed as
" 3. N. Amer. Timber sawn into rough planks or otherwise roughly prepared for the market." (Oxford English Dictionary)"
Juat out of curiosity, is "lumber" still used in the sense that you're using it (definition 1 of OED)? Or are you being contrary?
-- Andy BArss
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wrote:

You'd be missing about 7/8 of the thickness of the board by then, I'd guess.

Maybe a skosh, but not a whole lotta. One would have to secure the board in its twisted lovliness to a stiff substrate and then run it through the planer to take twist out. If it were square, do it 4 times to get a more decent facsimile of a straight board. IOW, it wouldn't be easy, CW.
What's your method?
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On 6/14/11 7:48 PM, CW wrote:

The only way it would is if you were using some sort of a sled. Short of that, you may thinks it's correcting a bow or twist, but it's not.
--

-MIKE-

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tells me what I have been doing for years doesn't work. Having been a professional machinist and tool maker for the past 25 years, have the concept of flat, paralel and square are pretty well down. Yes, it works. If it doesn't work for you, you aren't doing it right.
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snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.nett says...

OK, tell us how to take twist out of a board using a planer without a sled.
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On 6/15/11 12:37 AM, CW wrote:

I believe we may just have a misunderstanding concerning terminology. A planer will correct cupping, just fine.
It won't correct bow or twist on any board longer than, probably 2 feet. It's just not possible on a normal planer that most woodworkers have in their shops. "Having been a professional machinist and tool maker for the past 25 years," perhaps you've been using a planer with some super long bed and two sets of rollers or something.
--

-MIKE-

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wrote in message

Nope.
Yes it will.

Yes it is.

Delta 22-560
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snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.nett says...

I have one of those and it has corrected cupping just fine on many occasions but it has never done a damned thing for bow or twist.
Sorry, but you're either mistaken or lying.
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Maybe he's using shims and a sled?

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On 6/15/11 2:06 PM, Doug Miller wrote:

I asked about a sled and he said no. You'd think a reasonable person would say, "You can do it with shims or sled... that's how I do it."
--

-MIKE-

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On 6/15/11 12:07 PM, CW wrote:

Put up or shut, then. Let's see some video.
--

-MIKE-

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On 6/15/2011 1:13 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

The planer will flatten that board.
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@swbelldotnet says...

Yes, you can. I want to see his.
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Useful in extreme cases but, if I had a board that bad off I would either carve a propeller or throw it away. In any case, a few minutes with a hand plane and it is flat enough for the planer.
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On 6/15/11 1:26 PM, Leon wrote:

I asked if he used a sled, he said nope.
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wrote in message

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snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.nett says...

What, you don't know a kid with a cell phone?
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On 6/15/2011 1:37 AM, CW wrote:

Let me see if I got this technique right:
Buy perfectly flat wood to begin with, instead of "crappy" wood. Run flat perfect wood through the planer, and end up with perfectly flat planed wood...
Seems simple enough, and I doubt anyone would say this technique won't work.
Most if not all know the planer is not the tool to straighten non-perfect, crappy wood. The correct tool is the jointer, hand or motorized or you could buy a $30,000 cnc machine like Robocop has. Planer ain't it, whether you can make do with it or not.
--
Jack
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A jointer's purpose is to make one face/edge of your stock _flat_.
A planers job is to make the opposite face of a jointed board parallel to the jointed/flat face ... The results of this sequences is a board of even thickness throughout it's length.
If you run a bowed board through a planer without first removing the bow on a jointer, then flip if over and run it through again, the result may not be a board of even thickness throughout it's length.
One of the reason for this is the planer has rollers which feeds the stock through the planer that exerts a downward pressure while doing so, but without removing the bow.
The sequence for correctly dimensioning stock using a jointer, planer, and table saw is very precise and makes sense once you think about it.
When jointing badly bowed stock, the key is to cut it into smaller lengths, which has the effect of removing a given bow in a longer length.
--
www.ewoodshop.com

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