Re: Small Shop Layout

On 11 Jul 2003 09:43:28 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@sunlink.net (PA_Paul)Crawled out of the shop and said. . .:

Paul. i have a small shop also, about the same dimensions as you have described. i keep EVERYTHING on wheels in my shop. all my tools and machines can be moved to a spot on the floor where i can use them, and set up to run in under 1 minute. now don't get me wrong, i'd love to keep everything stationary, but in a small shop, casters are your best friend
as to keeping machines out in the barn,,,i would advise against it. moisture will attack the castings, even if the birds can be kept at bay.
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I have been working out of a 12x20 shop for years. I have to move the table saw out onto the driveway to cut full 4x8 sheet goods, but otherwise I can get by. The planer, miter saw, and shaper roll out from the wall for use. I have a radial arm saw, 14" band saw, 6" joiner, 12x48 lathe, dust collector, drill press, grinder, 6x48/12 sander, oscillating spindle sander, 16" scroll saw, and 1" belt sander in use. My workbench is 28x72. There is an 8-foot wall section devoted to lumber storage. It's crowded, but useable. harrym

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Traves W. Coppock wrote:

have no rust on any of the tools. The bare metal tools get a somewhat regular application wax, but I'm not religious about it. I'd put them on mobile bases and keep them in the shop to start with, but as you acquire more tools and need more room put them in the barn. You could leave them in the shop then move them to the barn when you working then move them back when your done. Covering tools is not a bad idea anyways, I have covers on most of the tools I don't use a lot and always on the TS when not working in the shop. I find old sheets, curtains in the dump for covers. the best are nylon shower curtains. Covers save on dust dust in the work shop. When you want to use a piece that has been sitting for a while you don't have to blow or sweep the dust off it into the air to use it. Remove the cover and your aready to go, and you can take he dust outside to shake them off.
Kevin
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<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"> <html> <head> <title></title> </head> <body> Traves W. Coppock wrote:<br> <blockquote type="cite" cite=" snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com"> <pre wrap="">On 11 Jul 2003 09:43:28 -0700, <a class="moz-txt-link-abbreviated" href="mailto: snipped-for-privacy@sunlink.net"> snipped-for-privacy@sunlink.net</a> (PA_Paul)Crawled out of the shop and said. . .:
</pre> <blockquote type="cite"> <pre wrap="">After several years away from ww, I'm finally able to start getting back to it. I have a large barn on my property, with a small cinderblock attached building. The small building is 14x18, and it's in here that I planned to build my shop. I was wondering, though, whether I should plan on putting my jointer and planer in the barn itself, instead of in the shop. The advantage would be space. The disadvantage is the barn can't be heated, and since birds take advantage of the space also, I'll have to keep the equip covered with a tarp or something similar.
The other alternative is keep them in my shop on wheels, and only pull out from under a bench or something when I need them.
Other thoughts or ideas?
thanks, Paul </pre> </blockquote> <pre wrap=""><!----> Paul. i have a small shop also, about the same dimensions as you have described. i keep EVERYTHING on wheels in my shop. all my tools and machines can be moved to a spot on the floor where i can use them, and set up to run in under 1 minute. now don't get me wrong, i'd love to keep everything stationary, but in a small shop, casters are your best friend
as to keeping machines out in the barn,,,i would advise against it. moisture will attack the castings, even if the birds can be kept at bay. </pre> </blockquote> My shop is in an old barn that is only heated when I work in it and I have no rust on any of the tools. The bare metal tools get a somewhat regular application wax, but I'm not religious about it.<br> I'd put them on mobile bases and keep them in the shop to start with, but as you acquire more tools and need more room put them in the barn. You could leave them in the shop then move them to the barn when you working then move them back when your done.<br> Covering tools is not a bad idea anyways, I have covers on most of the tools I don't use a lot and always on the TS when not working in the shop. I find old sheets, curtains in the dump for covers. the best are nylon shower curtains. Covers save on dust dust in the work shop. When you want to use a piece that has been sitting for a while you don't have to blow or sweep the dust off it into the air to use it. Remove the cover and your aready to go, and you can take he dust outside to shake them off.<br> <br> Kevin<br> <br> </body> </html>
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