Re: Small Compressor for the shop



Porter Cable pancake model - the ones that come with their Finish Nailers. Used mostly for inflating bicycle tires and children's toys. It sees a Nailer rarely.
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On Thu, 24 Jul 2003 14:44:45 -0400, "do$feratu"

Got four compressors.
A Crapsman, a Dayton, and two oil-free units I removed from ice cream dispensers.
The oil-free units are on casters; one is used for oil-free air to the darkroom (drying and chasing dust offa negatives, and the other oil-free unit is in an enclosure on the back of my model airplane building shop - for painting and general shop use.
The two large compressors serve the garage.
Once in a while (or once a week) we work on one or the other of the two '94 Impala SSes, and twice a week during mowing season (March through November) I re-inflate the riding mower tires.
Don't use compressed air for woodworking per se. Cheers, Fred McClellan the dash plumber at mindspring dot com
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Thu, Jul 24, 2003, 7:21pm (EDT+4) snipped-for-privacy@rogers.com (Upscale) says: I use a simple 3 gallon, hot dog compressor for inflating my wheelchair tires to 125 psi. <snip>
If you're in a wheelchair, you might wanna check the archives. We have, or had, several others in wheelchairs, and got quite a bit of info there.
JOAT Always put off until tomorrow something which, tomorrow, you could put off until, let's say, next year. - Lady Myria LeJean.
Life just ain't life without good music. - JOAT Web Page Update 23 Jul 2003. Some tunes I like. http://community-2.webtv.net/Jakofalltrades/JOATorJackOfAll/page4.html
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Thanks I'll check it out. My biggest concern about purchasing a cabinet saw is the height of it. I lopped 2" off the legs of the contractors saw I have making it much easier to use. Accomplishing something similar with a cabinet saw is fraught with difficulties.
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job),
front
Yes, that might be the only solution that I can use. Of course. moving around in a wheelchair, I'd have to be careful not to go over the edge of the platform because even 2" can be enough to tip me over if I'm not balanced right. If I ever have a big enough shop and can determine a final resting place for a cabinet saw where it never had to be moved, I could make a raised floor over the entire shop, sinking large sized machinery in slots in the floor.
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wrote:

You could also then run dust collection and power under the raised floor. This would make for a very clean shop layout.
If I didn't have a 7' ceiling in my basement shop, I'd love to install a raised floor, except with the tools not recessed.
I used to have a sore back from bending over the tools. I'm taller than average, so my tools now sit on 4" risers. Once you get everything adjusted to YOUR preferred height, no matter if it's up or down, you'll be glad you made the effort.
Good luck, Barry
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in message

The only difference is that usually, raising something to usable height is often easier than lowering. Maybe I should get a higher wheelchair although I have a problem already getting my knees under a few desks and stuff. I've got my chair at the optimum height where I can just pick up something from the floor and reach as high as possible. Seems to be the best choice right now.
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wrote:

What about some sort of ramp around the tools?
I figure open standed or bench top tools like contractor's saws, some jointers, planers, miter saws, etc... would be easy. The hard ones would be cabinet saws, closed stand jointers, and so on.
You'd only need the ramp around one or two tools, the others could have the legs removed and replaced with shorter, wooden stands.
You could even install the cabinet saw and jointer near each other, and build a raised floor only in that area. The TS, jointer, and planer work well together in a triangle, so this makes sense in any shop.
Barry
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Realistically, that's pretty much the only option. However safety reasons, there would have to be enough raised floor to preclude myself going over an edge accidentally while concentrating on the machinery. Figure at least 10'-12' area radius around a cabinet saw for cutting 8' sheets of whatever, you're talking about a great deal of shop floor space. Over 100 cubic feet at a minimum. It would have to be one huge shop. Probably practical to just do the entire shop with a raised floor and sink what I need into little pits of space.
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Sun, Jul 27, 2003, 5:08pm (EDT+4) snipped-for-privacy@rogers.com (Upscale) says: <snip> for cutting 8' sheets of whatever, <snip>
I don't mess with 8' sheets of anything anymore. Get 'em sliced on the panel saw where I buy. First 3 cuts free, rest 25 cents each - and they usually don't charge. Hell of a lot easier working with even a 4'X4' piece then a 4'X8' sheet.
JOAT Always put off until tomorrow something which, tomorrow, you could put off until, let's say, next year. - Lady Myria LeJean.
Life just ain't life without good music. - JOAT Web Page Update 23 Jul 2003. Some tunes I like. http://community-2.webtv.net/Jakofalltrades/JOATorJackOfAll/page4.html
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I gave them a print, a professionally drawn print and they still couldn't get it right without me supervising. Delivery? Your right to go with full sheets.
(Upscale) says:

have
forced
the
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wrote:

Tell me Upscale, how about using some sort of hydraulic or similar plan to have telescopic legs to a chair. OK, I am sure there must be issues in doing it that way, but might they be more easy to solve than finding solutions for each tool? Could it be that finding a way to do that might bring other advantages to the world outside of the shop for you too?
I'm not claiming to have any or all the answers but it seems to me like this "other question" should at least get asked here!
I've seen cars with adjustable shocks, and wonder if whatever technology is used in that, could be used to help you out with height adjustment too.
Sorry if this is dumb, but I just had the idea and thought I'd rush it along to you without thinking about it too much - I know stability may have to be addressed for safety, due to increased CoG. but I bet it could be solved!
Take Care, Gnube {too thick for linux}
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There are hydraulic height adaptations for electric wheelchairs, but I've never seen any for a manual wheelchair. There is a manual wheelchair on the market that permits the user to stand, but aside from a cost of $4000+ for it, one can't move around while in the standing position. I can stand for a very short period, so in my case, I suppose I could use a sitting cushion a few inches thicker than I'd normally use, but it would affect my balance and stability. On consideration, that's probably the most important aspect to consider, so it's likely the most practical solution would be the lowering of a particular machine or a raised floor.
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Look for some equipment with adjsutable legs or something that you can remove on the bottom. I had a 70's craftsman joint where the legs were adjustable. Also the old Unisaw with the cast iron ring around the bottom could be removed. If you take the levelers off of most tools you would gain about an inch.
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wrote:

Ah, yes, I can see why you'd be concerned, I have problems with abnormally weak lower back muscles and standing for any length of time does get me pretty wobbly, so leaning over my bench for any length of time gets me prone to a fall once my energy reserve is about done - trouble is, I get carried away with the fun and before I know it, I'm potentially in trouble as I got no reserves of strength left to keep upright, till I rest up and have another crack at it!! ;O) I found the freehand router and CS are the worst for this, the jigsaw isn't quite so bad.
They sure do charge like a wounded bull for the chairs don't they!?
If changing from one chair to another isn't too bad, how about a dedicated shop chair? Might be able to have it higher and more stable (by making it wider?)?
It's a challenge though for sure.
Take Care, Gnube {too thick for linux}
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They sure do charge like a wounded bull for the chairs don't they!?

Actually, that's not a bad idea. Some almost broken down chair might suffice. Considering the amount of dust they collect and the amount of time it takes to clean them, transferring to a different chair might be the cheapest route.
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wrote:

In time that may allow you to make the "perfect" chair too - here's hoping anyway! I'd guess wood could do it, it'd just be lighter perhaps! :O)
Take Care, Gnube {too thick for linux}
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2 HP Emglo works fine for up to a finish nailer....Maybe a full head 16 d nailer , but no more than that. OK for inflating tires and blowing some sawdust, I think Dewaltown them now. Look for a D55150 Dewalt. Should be fine for ya.
(Upscale) says:

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tnfkajs wrote:

I have the PC pancake model also. Besides my brad nailer, I use it to inflate tires on my cars and for an impact wrench. It probably wouldn't be up to the task nonstop all day, but it works fine for home auto repair work.
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