Re: Semi Gloat



Typically replacing an electrical cord is not that difficult. Remove the cord and its connectors, if it has any, and take them to your local hardware store. They should be able to fix you up with a replacement cord and the appropriate connectors for much less than $35. I'd imagine in the $10 range.
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On Sat, 01 Jul 2006 12:35:41 GMT, "Leon"

Another tip: Often you will find that a six or eight foot "pigtail" ( a length of cable with a molded male connector on one end, which is what you need) will cost -more- than a 25' extension cord in the next bin. Buy the extension cord and cut to size.
OTOH, the OP says the wires are frayed at router end. If the cord is otherwise good, cut the bad end off and reconnect it.
Wes
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wrote:

Not a difficult job, but depending on the type of strain relief used, you may have to buy the replacement cord from Dewalt.
Manufacturers are required to have strain relief (that is the cord must be able to take a certain amount of pull without separating from the motor housing). Some are simply restrictive mechanical clamps. Others are molded into the cord and fit into a recess in the motor housing. If molded, to do it right you need that cord. If clamped, you can get by with a cord of the same approximate size which will cost less.
Frank
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Problem with this is that extension cords are usually covered in stiff vinyl. I don't know about this particular router but factory cords are often rubber and flexible.

Good solution.
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LOL... Correct, now days. Do you remember the old B&D stuff from the 70's? The cords on the tools were sooooo stiff that you would go through a work out trying to stuff the cord in the tools case. Those cords make a typical extension cord look pretty limp.
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We have an old B&D drill at work. Still works fine. It lives in a drawer with the cord loosely piled on top of it.

70's?
typical
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wrote:

Wasn't that also the time period when they were putting cords on tools that were about 3 to 6 inches long? You had to have an extension cord to even use the silly things on a bench.

+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+ If you're gonna be dumb, you better be tough +--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
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Do I! What a PITA. In contrast my new Skil saw came with a 25ft cord.
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Do you remember the old B&D stuff from the 70's? I have a sander that I just started using again with exactly that cord it is such a pita. Makes me want to throw it, but it won't move.
On Sat, 01 Jul 2006 13:53:34 GMT, "Leon"

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I call it a good gloat, as far as the cord that is actually easy to replace. Like has been said you can get it from your local hardware store ACE / HD / Lowes what ever you have. I have replace many cords at work it's surprising what people will do sometimes.. Anyway IMHO this is a good buy and an easy fix good Job!
Al

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(Amazon.com product link shortened)_a_smtd/104-4352799-8356727?ie=UTF8

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