RE: Saw Horse

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This saw horse is listed in Mother Earth.
Built several, worked quite well.
Make sure to follow cut list, there is almost 100% utilization of 2x4s.
http://tinyurl.com/moplnx
Lew
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Now, if he would only reveal where to find 8' 2x4s for $2.
nb
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I get my framing stock, all kinds, free.... in the dumpsters at construction sites. Lots of other goodies, there, also. That's maximizing utilization.
That saw horse is not only heavy to haul around, you can't carry them easily or stack them easily on one another, out of the way, when not in use.
The ones I've made are relatively light weight, last years and I can stack 5 high before they're too tall for comfortable, easy reach.... and probably less than $2 each, not counting the 10 to 15 minutes labor it takes to make one.
Sonny
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"probably less than $2 each, not counting the 10 to 15 minutes labor it takes to make one."
Sonny,
You sure work cheap. at $2 for fifteen minutes of skilled labor, it works out to minimum wage. At $16/hr, that time would equate to Four Dollars w/o benefits.
Gooey
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Hoosierpopi wrote:

I'm starting to understand why others think you have a reading comprehension problem. :-)
"not counting"
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-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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$1.88 in Pittsburg, Ks. Fairly good too.
IMHO wooden horses are too much trouble and too cumbersome. I have a set of the good, fold-able metal horses and a set of the fairly heavy duty plastic ones. The metal ones have a 1,000 load rating when in their lowest adjustable position and they double as a base for my part- time assembly table. All fit well against side of my pickup bed. One pair of wooden horses will occupy 1/2 of the bed.
Ron
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

They forgot to put a top on that work bench. :-)
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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-MIKE- wrote:

Want a horse with a flat work top? Try these
http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/Projects/SawHorse /
They stack, /can't/ wobble, and you'll probably need a pretty serious saw to cut one in half. :)
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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Morris Dovey wrote:

Yeah, I still like those. :-)
...especially how you can use it as a clamp.
How do they stack, I can't figure it out.
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-MIKE-

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Mike

At a guess - swap the legs end 2 end - single leg fits in the 'clamp'
Similar to the - Using a clamp-on vise pix - visualise the single leg as the clampee<g>
CYA Steve
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Stephen Quinn wrote:

Don't swap end-to-end. The single leg /is/ the clampee for the sawhorses below. Each adds about 5" to the stack.
The only time I've ever stacked mine was to test stackability.
I can't recall that I've ever actually used one to support material being sawed - what I don't cut with a stationary saw usually goes on this:
http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/Projects/PanelCart /
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Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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Dang Morris! You've got a lot of shop space there. Must be nice.
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Upscale wrote:

You'd think so, but it's amazing how fast the place shrinks when I'm gluing up a batch of 8'x6' solar panels. :(
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Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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Upscale wrote:

He's got more than shop space. Everything I've ever seen of Morris' setup is elegantly ...engineered.. I think that's the appropriate word here.
Tanus
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Tanus wrote:

Thank you, but you should know that I don't bother to take photos of the things that don't turn out so well - or the stuff that's less likely to be interesting.
My budget is pretty tight, and most of what I might otherwise spend on "ready-made" stuff goes into solar R&D. When I absolutely have to have something, I look for inexpensive ways to build it for myself - which is why you see all the 1x4, 2x4, and inexpensive plywood in my shop equipment - and since I can't afford to waste even that, I usually build the stuff several times in my head and on paper before I work up the courage to make any sawdust.
Every now and then, when I have time, I take a short tour of websites belonging to regulars here, and I've never failed to be inspired by the ingenuity and polish of the projects I see. For anyone who's never done that, I think you'll find a lot to admire and think about.
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Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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"Morris Dovey" wrote:

Something the ME saw horse handles quite well since it was designed specificfally to handle that task without suffering accidental cuts.
Lew
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

I noticed that, too. If I had a TMEN horse, I'd still use my RAS (which also seems well-designed for the task). :)
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Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

I imagine building it would be fun, but what would you actually DO with it after you get it built? It's too cumbersome and heavy to move around - I guess you could build a house around it...
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It really only weighs 3, 2x4 studs. I have step stools that are heavier than that.
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Leon wrote:

You're right, of course. I was comparing it to the two plastic sawhorses I use that weigh 2.5 pounds apiece. And upon thinking on it, I retract my comment about "cumbersome." I figure you could disassemble the thing to carry to the next job site.
'Course you'd have to save the nails, too, or it wouldn't be quite right.
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