Re: Root canal or extraction ?

Page 2 of 2  
Which part of MOST LIKELY didn't you understand Dan??????
--
If at first you don't succeed, you're not cut out for skydiving


"Dan Valleskey" <valleskey at comcast dot net> wrote in message
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
writes:

Then his dentist was either incompetent, or your husband was just acting macho when the dentist asked him if he was numb yet and said yes when he really wasn't because root canals, although lengthy procedures, do not normally hurt and it is always better than losing the tooth. I have had 5 of the damn things and 4 caps by 3 different dentists and although I never looked forward to any of them, they were no more painful than any other procedure. Now maybe your husband is different but he would be the exception rather than the rule so exactly what is the point of you trying to scare the hell out of the person trying to make an important decision or do you just like to argue?
--
If at first you don't succeed, you're not cut out for skydiving



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@nc.rr.com writes:

I repeat:

Now, in regard to your insults to my husband and perhaps to me as well, as I said, it does depend. As an example, I had major surgery from which I had *no* pain the day after surgery (and never a problem to this day 23 years later), I repeat, "no pain." (Can you say you've had a 2-hour invasive abdominal surgery and not had pain from it?) A dear friend of mine went through months of hell from exactly the same type of surgery, even to the point of having to have her incision held open to heal from the inside of her abdomen. I'd never heard of such a thing happening with that surgery, but it happened to her.
Personally, I think it's a rotten thing to tell someone any surgery will not hurt, and that includes a root canal. It does truly depend on the person. There's a big difference in relaying your own experience and telling someone it won't hurt. You cannot know what will or will not hurt for another person, or even what their particular situation is (unless they relate it to you in detail!).
You can call my thoughts, based on fact, arguing if you like. Frankly, I don't care.
Another little tidbit, I personally think all of those who complain of toothaches might just be sissies. I've never had a toothache in my life in spite of an inherited tooth enamel problem. Same dentist who fixed my husband's tooth wanted to do a root canal on one of mine. He told me, "The nerve is exposed, and the tooth needs to be capped to prevent toothaches." I refused, told him there are no nerves in my teeth. He showed me x-rays and identified the nerves. (???!) Full of it, he was. Thirty years later, still no toothache!
Teeth should always be saved, if at all possible. However, the procedures to do so are not always pleasant. Fact of life that is.
Glenna
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Friday 28 Jan 2005 3:20 am, Glenna Rose scribbled:

I beg to differ. It does not depend on the person. It depends on the tooth. I've had a number of root canals, some in relation to an automobile accident. Some of them hurt, some didn't. :-)
The first two were to replace fillings which had fallen out. The root canals happened when I was about 17 or so. The fillings had fallen out because, being a boy, I got an irresistible urge to chew gum after coming out of the dentist's office.
--
Luigi
Replace "nonet" with "yukonomics" for real email
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ah, a I thought, you do just like to argue. At one time you would have found the right mark but anymore, it is simply not worth the trouble.
--
If at first you don't succeed, you're not cut out for skydiving


"Glenna Rose" < snipped-for-privacy@pmug.org> wrote in message
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I don't want to scare anyone but my only attempt at a root canal was disastrous. I had it done and then a couple days later it started to hurt. Then it really hurt. Then it HURT LIKE HELL. Went back to the dentist and he couldn't see any infection or any other reason for it to hurt. Finally he decided it waould have to be extracted. After THREE loads of novacaine the pain was as bad as ever. In the end I had to be given a general anesthetic. One day I'd much rather forget! FobbyTown
Bang! "Awww, shit!" (Another day in Paradise.)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Allow me to put 2 cents in here... I am a general dentist/woodworker...I do root canals. Your discussions are all valid, to a degree, but I think you've failed to "hit the nail on the head".
What differentiates the different scenarios has something to do with the person and their resistance to infection... it has something to do with the tooth and how many canals and how easy or difficult they are to thoroughly clean and it has MOSTLY to do with the bacteria that are causing the painful infection. While there are some scenarios that are difficult to explain, the great majority of cases (statistically in the high 90 percents) are straight forward, with zero or only minor painful episodes AFTER the infection is under control.
The longer the person endures their discomfort/pain before initiating treatment, the more difficult it is for anesthetic to completely numb the tooth. We refer to that as the 'hot tooth' syndrome... for no known reason, everything can seem thoroughly numb, but when the treatment is started, there is still intense pain... more anesthetic than usual is required and/or it takes a long time to "soak" in and take effect. Again, over 95% of the treatments are painless from beginning to end... with this exception... and the patient almost always plays a role in creating the exception, although it is the bacterial infection that is to blame.
In addition, the longer someone waits for treatment, the more the bacteria establish the tooth and the surrounding bone as their 'home'... so the treatment of the tooth and its infected nerve is sometimes not enough and antibiotics are needed... and the longer the infection sat festering (sometimes painlessly) the stronger the infection when it finally causes enough pain to go to the dentist. We don't exactly know why an infection can sit quietly for a long time and then suddenly flare up like gangbusters, but it often relates either to the type of bacteria and/or a decrease in the person's ability to fight off the bacteria. (So being overworked, or not getting enough sleep, or being very emotionally stressed, or fighting off another infection like a cold or flu or whatever, seems to allow a small or quiet infection to snowball.) Again, it is the bacteria that are to blame and they are not all alike... since antibiotics are not usually needed, no antibiotics are prescribed... and the result after the initial root canal visit usually is 1-3 days of discomfort (not pain) that subsides to nothing. The exception is treated with antibiotics, but again, there are differences... the tried and true antibiotic of choice is penicillin for dental infections - and it is effective, again in the 90% range... but if/when penicillin doesnt' seem to be effective, which is sometimes related to how long the bacteria have been active, etc., the more chance there is that a newer/stronger/significantly more expensive antibiotic will be needed. During that time, when the right antibiotic is determined and it actually starts working, the patient is often in pain... but the culprit is not the person, the tooth, the "root canal treatment" or the dentist, but the bacteria and the infection they produce.
Another variation on the theme is that bacterial infections that aren't overly aggressive may create pus that finds its way out through an opening in the gums... in other words, it ends up leaking pus into the mouth through the equivalent of a pimple. Because of this, the person may notice a bad taste but doesn't usually suffer much pain. Other infections create pus rapidly and, if they have no quick way out, the pus can leak into parts of the face and you can wake up with part of your face swollen. Often, these infections were known about for weeks or even months as discomfort came and went, but there was never much pain until one day when it all changed... again, the pain and swelling, etc. is from the infection, not the treatment. And often the person suffers extreme pain if the pus builds up very rapidly and has no place to go (yet)... the pressure buildup causes the pain... and sometimes the bacteria create gases which increase the pain/pressure... until the pus finds someplace to let out... which is rarely like a small pimple in these cases... and the face gets quite swollen... and as the swelling makes them look worse, the pain lessens because there is less pressure in a confined space. Again, the villain is the bacteria, not the treatment... and if getting numb is not simple, it is not the dentist who is to blame, it is consequence of severe infection.
Bottom line is still: save the tooth if it can be saved... root canal treatment is the method used to save the tooth... over 95% of the cases are straightforward and close to painless... and prevention or early treatment usually pays off with fewer complications.
It is my belief that the painless (or nearly painless) root canal treatments cause no comments... but the rare painful cases cause the story to be repeated over and over so that the reputation of root canal treatment is that it is a painful procedure... but it just ain't so.
I think this was a pretty complete general consultation on the issue and I said all I have to say... so I reserve the right to not hold online consultations about individual situations... if you post questions or email me, I may or may not reply. I hope you understand.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
sawtooth wrote:

Well, I've got this tooth, see... It's got a root in it, and if I put the end of a propane torch on the end of it, I feel a burning sensation. Is this normal? Do I need a root canal? :)
Thanks for the lucid, well-composed, professional perspective on this issue.
--
Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
Linux fanatic, and certified Geek; registered Linux user #243621
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Nah, you are just a wimp :-)
--
If at first you don't succeed, you're not cut out for skydiving



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.