Re: Refurbishing old hand tools - follow up - How did it

Start with these- http://www.bhi.co.uk/hints/rust.htm http://www.stovebolt.com/techtips/rust/electrolytic_derusting.htm http://www3.telus.net/public/aschoepp/electrolyticrust.html http://www.davidbradley.net/ERR.html http://www.instructables.com/id/E17UQMY28PEQ6T2A5Z/?ALLSTEPS
That's more than enough to get you started. Some theory, some nice pictures.
I took a plastic 5 gallon plastic bucket and hot glued closed the hole in bottom :) .
I cut two pieces of rebar about 4 inches longer than the bucket is deep and drilled a hole through one end of each. Filed, wire brushed, sanded, green padded the rust that would come off of them - 2 minutes max. total.
Spot hot glued them to the bucket at top and near bottom inside the bucket, hole up, one on each side of bucket.
Took a piece of 14 gauge house wiring, ran it through the rebar holes, 2" insulation stripped where it passed through the rebar holes. Looped a wrap tightly around rebar, ran wire under the bucket lip and around to the the other rebar, through the hole and a wrap around the second rebar, and under the lip and back to the first one. Spot hot glued the wire to the bucket every few inches so it would stay under the lip and out of the way. It's not as pretty as some in the pictures, but technically sound.
Tied a string around the two rebars to connect them and act as a 'clothesline'.
Made an S hook out of a couple inches of leftover wire and hung it on the string, with another short length of string attached to hold what I'm derusting.
Had not found the recommended sodium carbonate in store during last visit, so I threw in a handful of of sodium bicarb (1/4 of a small box ?), and filled the bucket with water. My water is pretty conductive anyway - your mileage may vary. You just need an electrolyte - but minimize the chloride. No table salt. Acids will damage the item you are derusing, and will also eat the rebar.
Hung parts in liquid off the S hook, about 1' exposed to hook power to, and keep clip out of water. Hooked small battery charger positive to rebar and negative to parts - my test case was some spring steel radial arm saw part hold downs, about 9x1x1/16 inch, heavily rusted.
Turned power on, drew about 1 amp at 12v . Instant bubbling seen and water went from clear to muddy in two minutes.
10 minutes later I wiped the scum off the parts and stuck them back in, other end up. 10 more minutes in the bath, then a clean water rinse (you have to get the electrolyte off of them), wipe dry, and light oil (parts will flash rust if not treated upon removal). Looked new, with a couple of small pits.
Now I keep searching for things to put in, and it's running most of the time as I experiment. Some things take a few minutes, others longer. I'll need to come up with a sturdier hanger for larger items - probably a 1x1 with holes drilled to slide over the rebar stubs.
Hope this helps.
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Newsgroups: rec.woodworking Subject: Re: Refurbishing old hand tools - follow up Date: Mon, 06 Nov 2006 19:44:47 -0800 Organization: Posted via Supernews, http://www.supernews.com
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Dick Keats wrote:

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wild snipped-for-privacy@swamprabbit.com.invalid wrote:

...
The rebar gets corroded by the derusting process anyhow so you can skip that step. You can also use the electrolytic process itself to derust your sacrificial electrodes if you want.

It is ususally in with the laundry detergents.

end up. 10 more minutes in the bath, then a clean water rinse (you have to get the electrolyte off of them), wipe dry, and light oil (parts will flash rust if not treated upon removal). Looked new, with a couple of small pits.

I typically scrub the parts with a brass pot brush (found in the housewares section of the supermarket under running water and a little soap helps too.
Then I pop it into the oven at about 150 F or hit it with a hair drier. That post-derusting heating is essential for handsaws and other steel in the same hardness range. The electrolytic process drives hydrogen into the metal (hydrogen embrittlement) so the part will be prone to stress cracking unles sit is driven back out.
Then I typically slather Johnson's paste wax on it while it is still warm.

No kidding.
Good thing I don't have a swimming pool, I might be tempted to drive a rusty old van into it and dim the neightborhood lights.
--

FF


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snipped-for-privacy@spamcop.net wrote:

A). It doesn't have to be your pool. B). Make a video if you do it. ;)
R
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