re-phrase old piano refinish


Sorry but perhaps I may have over stated. The piano is not of any monetary value but more of sentimental. I simply would like to strip and refinish to a reasonable finish (coffee table top). Not a mirror finish. I believe the wood is walnut. I have done considerable woodworking however not any stripping and refinishing.That is why I am looking for step by step instructions.
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recoat it with what ever clear material you normally work with.
Sorry about the green paint, but you did use heirloom and refinish in the same sentence.
Pete
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www.refinishwizard.com posts might be helpful.

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I assume you're going to be refinishing it inside. A piano is pretty big and heavy, upright, grand or whatever. So, if it was me, I'd attack the situation with that perspective in mind.
It's going to take you awhile to get the whole job done.
1) Figure out a corner of a room where you can work on it and is amenable to taping up some drop sheets to segregate it from everything else. 2) Look into some non-toxic strippers. The amount of stripper you're going to be using, it would be unadvisable to use anything else inside the home. Talk to your local paint supplier. 3) Use, buy, borrow, rent or whatever an orbital sander. If you can get something with a dust collector port attached, all the better, since it's an enclosed space. Get a suitable dust mask and/or face shield too. This is an enclosed area, right? 4) If any part of the surface of the piano is marred beyond sanding capability, then you're going to have to look into some type of wood filler. Again, see your local wood store or paint supplier. I wouldn't be too quick to go to a Home Depot for any of this stuff, you'll get better service and better advice from a local paint business. 5) Not knowing what kind of finish is on the piano, I can only suggest how to proceed. The easiest route is if you're putting on a finish similar to what you've stripped. That way any blemishes that sanding didn't catch will be minimized. Whatever you choose, do some tests in some inconspicuous areas on the piano.
Once you get a finish you like, just follow the instructions and be satisfied with what you've done. I hope you've got the stamina for all the elbow grease you're going to have to put into this. If you're like me, you'll curse and swear your way through the entire project, but it will be worth it in the end.
Enjoy!
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Upscale wrote:

The veneer on some pianos is very thin - DAMHIKT. Aggressive sanding is not a good idea.
--
It's turtles, all the way down

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Lee wrote:

If the piano is nitrocellulose lacquer, and there is a very good chance it is, you might find the info here helpful.
http://antiqueradios.com/features/lacquer.shtml
Stewart
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