RE: Not Today

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The Subject line pretty much say's it all, NOT TODAY!
At least 95F outside window all afternoon.
No painting, no laying resin, no drinking beer. WHAT?
No drinking beer?
Afraid not.
Even a cold one doesn't taste good on a day like this.
Time to stick with water and stay in the shade.
Robert, if you are trying to do a re-roofing job in weather like this, good luck.
You and the crews repairing chuck holes in the roads.
Lew
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On Monday, September 7, 2015 at 8:35:43 PM UTC-5, Lew Hodgett wrote:

We had a few days of mild temps and humidity, then yesterday was unbearably hot and muggy. Sapped our energy!
Our road repair crews don't how to use a level.
Sonny
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How do you use a level to get a crowned surface?
Ok, this sounds like a sarcastic question and it is. But sometimes there's a real answer that's fascinating... but I doubt it.
Puckdropper
--
Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

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On 9/8/2015 9:51 AM, Puckdropper wrote:

Well consider this. If roads were level water would not run towards the drains.
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On Tuesday, September 8, 2015 at 9:51:33 AM UTC-5, Puckdropper at dot wrote :

's

If you didn't use a level, what would you use?
As a commercial superintendent, I have literally been responsible for acres or concrete and pavement. I can crown a road or drive with a 4' level, a sighted level or a water level.
Standard drainage declination is 1/4" per foot (no snow consideration), les s or more if stamped by civil engineer.
Say you wanted to put a crown on the road to make it drain to the gutters o n each side that drain into a runoff drain box or to a collection point on your street. Start at the drain lip, and using something as simple as a 4' level, drive a peg (we use rebar scraps) until it is 1" higher than level. Now you have proper drainage. Repeat from the top of your peg to establi sh another 4'. To get the standard 10' lane, from the top of your last peg go another 2', then raise it 1/2". Now you have one half of a two lane st reet, with the proper drainage established.
When you pour concrete, you pour to the top of the pegs, using your straigh t edge from peg to peg to keep it crowned. When you are laying asphalt, yo u are laying it over graded material that was laid, cut and compacted to gr ade by establishing those same pegs,except that the pegs they use are wood and have highly colored brushes on them so they can be easily seen by machi ne operators.
For road work, parking lots, and other large areas, you simply use a sighte d level (the instrument you see guys peeking through on job sights)and "sti ck" or "rod" to do EXACTLY the same thing.
Let your mind wander. You can change the angles to anything you want, you can start at the high point and go down instead of up, you can make a wide, single slope road or drive, etc. To make the curves more gentle, simply m ake your points that establish the desired finished surface grade closer to gether.
When we are doing paved walks, small patios, or anything else small we just use a 4' level. When I was in commercial, I used the instrument (level) s o much I had it in my truck half the time. My concrete guy uses a 6' level zip tied to a 10' straightedge, and establishes his grades in short order once he figures out the math.
Not sexy, but you honestly sounded like you didn't know.
Robert
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Thanks Robert. You're right, not sexy but still interesting reading.
Puckdropper
--
Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

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Puckdropper <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote in

Agree, that was interesting to know.
Are things done differently for very wide roads? I have in mind some parts of I-95 in FLA and GA that are 4 and 5 lanes wide on each side, and seem to be darn close to perfectly flat. They certainly don't drain worth a darn when it rains. Is there some limit on how low the edges can be, that prevents cambering very wide roads?
John
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On Tuesday, September 8, 2015 at 4:33:56 PM UTC-5, John McCoy wrote:

Well, if that was interesting... a few more thoughts.
Wider roads become problematic due to existing drainage conditions. Factor s to consider are the type of surface (concrete/asphalt) as they drain at d ifferent speeds. Also, the type of drainage that serves the surface becaus e even if the roads are covered with water you don't want to overfill the d rains. Without decent airflow to displace the rushing rain water, suction will occur and drainage will stop. With those two simple factors in mind, it is the accepted practice to design the drainage serve certain areas base d on it drainage capability. Trust me, you would rather have water on the road over a drainage system that is full and cannot drain because it is suc king air.
And yes, depending on its design a wide set of lanes can have a nice camber to it, and unless severe you won't notice it in your car. Around here, fo r off ramps and entry ramps that are 2-3 lanes wide, they use a single slop e draining into a system that handles only that ramp, and dumps somewhere e lse. No camber, only slope.
Basically today the setup is the same to establish road beds. In the old d ays, angles were "turned" (coined by turning the head of the instrument to the correct angles to determine a curve. Now they use a theodolite, which does the same thing with incredible accuracy. They still use sighted level s in some cases, but also use lasers for long distances.
Most $400 levels will shoot a level line about 150' or so with no more than 1/4" deviation. Lasers will go farther and are more accurate (and much, m uch more expensive) but you don't have to deal with heat shimmers or trying to read the measuring rod. When I was setting forms and leveling tilt pan els, we used to take a reading in the morning, move the instrument around n oon and reshoot, then move closer to the work and shoot one more time at th e end of the day.
Really, it was fascinating for me to learn that stuff, although today I use an inexpensive level and the largest thing I have shot in lately was a fri ckin' patio.
Robert
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On 9/10/2015 6:57 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

HA! Getting ready to pour my second Rebecca Creek.... Simple solution, install a bent pipe.
Can't wait to see y'all this Christmas.
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Speaking of level, one of the mysteries of modern life is why modern day road paving technology is unable to get a manhole level with the road.
When I was young, pretty much all the manholes were flush with the road (when you ride a bicycle, you're pretty aware of such things).
But today, around here at least, it seems impossible to make them flush, other than the occasional accident. If the manhole isn't an inch or two below the road, then the manhole itself will be flush, but surrounded by a moat 6 to 8 inches wide, which is an inch or two below the road.
Certainly this is one area where modern technology isn't progress.
John
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On 9/8/2015 11:05 AM, John McCoy wrote:

Roads get resurfaced, man hole covers don't. A simple spacer to extend the hole lip would be the easy answer.
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Leon wrote:

Spacers do exist, but my town doesn't know that.
--
GW Ross

Men still remember the first kiss
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They have those - it's a simple ring that sits on the top of the housing to lift the cover up by 3/4 inch (*). I have one - for some reason one was left in the middle of the sidewalk when they resurfaced roads near me, so I picked it up and brought it home.
But the problem of uneven manholes exists on both new and resurfaced roads around here. Some of it seems to be a failure in paving (the pavement being above the manhole), and some of it seems to be a problem of subsurface prep (the subsurface compacting, leaving the manhole above the pavement).
John
(* I assume they come in other sizes too, the one I have is 3/4)
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On Tue, 8 Sep 2015 16:05:46 +0000 (UTC), John McCoy

It cause of gobal warming as all things bad are.
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On Monday, September 7, 2015 at 8:35:43 PM UTC-5, Lew Hodgett wrote:

I nicked 100 here on Labor Day, and should hit it briefly around 4-5 again today. I have one roof replacement in process, and I usually only work on roof repairs, not on full replacements. Thankfully, I only had one of thos e to do this summer where I was working out in the sun, in the afternoon on a dark brown shingle roof. It was an emergency repair for a great client and I had no choice. I had red burns on my knees and down the side of my l egs and butt that lasted for about 3 days.
I remember 40 years ago I would work all day as a laborer, than get off and go eat pizza and drink a schooner of beer (or more!) to cool off. Now... I get off, go cool off in a fast food joint and drink tea, then go home and take some Advil. After showering, I drink more tea, eat some dinner, work on paperwork and go to bed.
Even my guys tease me. "Hey Robert, we're going to stop for a six. You wa nt us to get you some Metamucil and Advil?" If it has been a long July/Aug ust day, I might just take them up on it.
Robert
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On 9/8/2015 12:56 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

We just built a backyard shed for a client as part of a whole house remodel.
Yesterday, simply tired of watching someone else work on the shed roof, I bent down, threw up a bundle of shingles to my shoulder, took two steps forward, said "like hell!", two steps back, and dropped the SOB back onto the pile.
Fug it ... at 72, ain't my job to do something that would take two weeks to get over, IF I had been lucky enough to make it the 100' to the backyard.
Keep forgetting that parts of me are somehow older than others ...
--
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On 9/9/2015 1:06 PM, Swingman wrote:

This morning I cut a piece of trim for the front door. I should be on the front step right now putting it in place, instead, I'm reading newsgroups in the air conditioned family room. Maybe later, its 91 right now. And I'm considerably younger than you, only 70.
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On 9/9/2015 12:40 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

That there's a day's work, on some days ...

Basically, somewhere in your late 60's, you start to feel like whatever the temperature is, in Fahrenheit.
That's my take on the ubiquitous "Feels Like" temperature on the evening news.
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OK, so we're all moving to the top of Pikes Peak, then.
John
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On Wed, 9 Sep 2015 18:26:39 +0000 (UTC), John McCoy

Who is bringing the oxygen?
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