RE: No Electricity Table Saw

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to crank the saw?
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Doug Brown wrote:

You don't have to crank it while using it, technically. It adjusts the height of the blade. Unfortunately, with hard woods, you can only cut "so deep," so you need to take shallow passes... kind of like a router.
The guy in the video seems pretty adept at "making a pass-adjusting blade height-making a pass-adjusting blade height" pretty quickly, as I figure most users would get after some practice.
In any case, it seems to be designed with hold down clamps so it can be guided singled-handedly.
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raises the blade height by a user adjustable amount with each pass. Art
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Artemus wrote:

Great idea, and you're right. It would be a pretty easy thing, mechanically. I've seen it on 18-19th century machines.
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wrote

For the money you can get an electric TS. ;~)
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wrote

Table saws in general do a bit of everything. And when you start to do small stuff on the table saw, the danger element goes up. Soooo......, something that reduces the risk and makes small parts may be a niche product. But for someone who could use it, it is probably really worth the money.
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Lee Michaels wrote:

FWIW, for small stuff consider an RAS--cutting those tiny little bits at the end of his video is easy on one. Remember that an RAS will rip fine with the blade in the crosscut position as long as the length of the stock is less than the blade travel. The danger is much less because you have many options for securing the stock, which doesn't have to move during the cut, and with a fresh fence you automatically have zero clearance.
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message wrote

What's involved in sharpening or replacing the blade?
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On 10/27/2009 9:50 AM Nonny spake thus:

Dunno for sure, but it looks to be no more complicated than removing a few screws. (I'm guessing there are some blade clamps on the bottom edge.)
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On Mon, 26 Oct 2009 23:46:36 -0400, "Lee Michaels"

That blade on there will be more than happy to cut right through you if you get careless with it, just like a circular blade.
http://www.byrnesmodelmachines.com/tablesaw.html
You could buy the disc sander and drum sander along with it for less money.
Doing dovetails on that thing was pretty cool though.
-Kevin
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On 10/27/2009 9:58 AM Kevin spake thus:

Yeah, just think of the production speed (and accuracy!) one could get cranking out pins and tails. 90% of your time would be spent chopping out waste.
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If it were simply production I was concerned with, I'd have the dovetailed boxes made, finished and delivered. I'm in it for me and my enjoyment.
R
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Lee Michaels wrote:

And this thing's really only useful for crosscuts, no? If you have to rip anything of significant length you're going to have to switch to a different tool.
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wrote

.....Or less even. I just bought a new 12" TS, L.H tilt, with sliding table, two table extensions and a primitive biesemeyer style fence for less than AUD$700
diggerop
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diggerop wrote:

Just remember that to get a flat bottomed dovetail with a table saw you need a special grind on the blade--but Forrest will sell you one of those for about 1/10 what the device under discussion costs.

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How is that comparable? Other than the fact that they both cut wood, they are barely related in market(ing).
I think a large number of people would be interested just because it's small and quiet. Not too many people have wives that wouldn't object to firing up the table saw in the basement at two in the morning. I'm finding machine noise more objectionable as I age. I use earplugs, but I don't like the noise, period. You can also stick it up on a shelf when it's not in use.
R
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RicodJour wrote:

True dat. I have a friend who uses nothing but hand tools, because he works in his living room... yes, he's single, and he lives in the upper half of a duplex.
> I'm

It's all relative, isn't it? This new-to-me Delta seems silent compared to that POS direct-drive Ryobi I replaced.
But I still wouldn't run it at 2am. :-)
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On 10/27/2009 9:27 AM RicodJour spake thus:

Yep, agreed. After my initial misgivings, I realized that this is a pretty original tool worthy of consideration. I would expect to see more tools like it, and more variations in the next few years. And it certainly wouldn't be beyond a dedicated DIYer to come up with a doable design.
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Agreed. It's not clear that having the workpiece move is the best way and it is certainly not as safe as having the saw blade mounted on a sliding track and moving it through the clamped workpiece. It would be slower, though.
R
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On 10/27/2009 9:49 AM RicodJour spake thus:

Regarding safety, my guess is that this saw is only unsafe in the sense that a bandsaw is more unsafe than a table saw, as counterintuitive as that seems. I say that because a table saw, while it is probably actually more dangerous, warns the user with a screaming blade and other noise, while the bandsaw just sits there humming away, ready to take off one's thumb.
The Bridge City saw (what do we call that tool, anyhow?) is even quieter than a bandsaw, so that probably increases its inherent dangerousness. But I'd be willing to learn to use it. Just have to pay attention every second to where your hands are.
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