Re: newbie tool help

Freak of Nature wrote:

What kind of help? You mean lend you 50 bucks 'till payday? Nah, I have to buy tools myself.
As for the $300, you can't get your list for that if you want quality. Some low priced tools are OK, but if you want reliable, long lasting, accurate tools, spend more up front. A 12" drill press is $180. A DeWalt or Porter Cable random orbital sander is $60. You can cheap out of the drill, a Ryobi 14.4 volt is about $50. No money left for the router. that will be about $180 or so.
Don't buy any tool until you have the need for it. OK the drill will always be handy, but some can be put off for a while. Can't recall the last time I used my corded drill so that may be one to pass on for now.
You can buy cheap tools that will eventually frustrate you for even less than $300, but in the long run, you will not be happy with them. Let your projects be your guide as to tool buying. Consider hand tools also. Often they can be more practicla than a powered one. - Ed snipped-for-privacy@snet.net http://pages.cthome.net/edhome
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An excellent common sense approach I approve of.
In that light let me recommend that instead of worrying about laser lights on drill presses you purchase some tools you will always have a use for. Books on woodworking. They are amazing things and far more useful then a laser light. They not only give information on tools they tell you how to use them and take care of them, how to measure things (not a simple task if you want to do it right), join things. sand things. finish things, and on and on and on. . Mike G. snipped-for-privacy@heirloom-woods.net Heirloom Woods www.heirloom-woods.net
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Mike ... what would you recommend, for cabinetmaking and ww in general.
________________________________ antonomasia -@- canada -dot- com
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That is a tough one. Not because they are hard to find but because there are so many. The finishing books is easy but let me mull it over where I can see my whole library and I'll give you my pick list later today.
--
Mike G.
snipped-for-privacy@heirloom-woods.net
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snipped-for-privacy@my.sig wrote:

Don't overlook your local library. I have these checked out: - Mehler "The Table Saw Book" - Duginske "The Art of the Band Saw" - TimeLife "Sharpening & Tool Care"
Former books checked out include: - R.J. De Cristoforo "The Table Saw Book - David Schiff & Kenneth S. Burton, Jr. "Jigs, Fixtures & Setups" - R.J. DeCristoforo "The Jigs & Fixtures Bible" - Udo Schmidt "Bldg Kitchen Cabinets" - Danny Proulx "Bldg Woodshop Workstations" - Pat Warner "The Router Book" - Rex Cauldwell "Wiring A House" - FWW "Shop Accessories You Can Build" - Kenneth Burton "Cutting-Edge Table Saw Tips & Tricks" - Norm Abram "The New Yankee Workshop" - Bill Stankus "How to Design & Build Your Ideal Woodshop" - Roger W. Cliffe "Table Saw Basics" - Sando Nagyszalanczy "Woodshop Jigs & Fixtures" - Fine Homebuilding: Tricks of the Trades Time/Life Books - Routing & Shaping - Shop-Made Jigs & Fixtures - Advanced Routing
Most of them have been checked out more than once.
(Of necessity I keep track of library materials in my PDA. These were just cut/paste from the PDA lists.)
HTH
-- Mark
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Yes, Mark, that does help. Into -my- PDA they go for the next trip to the library.
Thx, Tom ________________________________ antonomasia -@- canada -dot- com
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snipped-for-privacy@my.sig wrote:

(Possibly unnecessary info.) Books the local branch doesn't have that you want they may be able to get for you from other libraries. It may take a week or two, but it beats paying $50 for a title that may not be that great for you at your particular skill/interest level.
-- Mark
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OK here it is but a pox on you for asking. Had to run around to all my reading material stashes to put together a fair representation.
Note, these are books from my own library that I have found helpful. It is not a condemnation of any other books nor does it address tool specific books, subject specific books, or the more esoteric books on woodworking I own.
Finishing Bob Flexner's Understanding wood finishes and Applying Finishes Ian Hosker's Complete Woodfinishing Jim Richey's Finishing Methods of work (a compilation of tips from 25 years of Fine Woodworking) Bill Russel's Finishing Magic (A bit advanced and esoteric but fascinating).
General Woodworking Jon Arno's The Woodworkers Visual Handbook Nick Engler's Woodworking Wisdom Tom Begnal's The Woodworkers Handbook Rodale Press's Shop Tips Chris Simpson's The Complete Guide to Woodworking
Two must haves Patrick Spielman's Sharpening basics Sandor Nagyszalancay's Fixing and Avoiding Woodworking Mistakes
Cabinet Making A note on this category. I must have a dozen cabinet making specific books. All of them are very informative but not what I would call comprehensive. However Kevin Fristad and John Ward's Cabinetmaking Procedures For The Small Shop seems to be the one I refer to most often.
--
Mike G.
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Hey - a pox and a booklist in one!
Thanks for the list Mike.
    Tom
________________________________ antonomasia -@- canada -dot- com
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No problem it's the first time in years I've had all the books together somewhere where I can find them with out having to send out search parties..
Take care Mike
--
Mike G.
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My suggestion is buy used. You can get very good quality used tools for a fraction of what you'll pay for new tools. Often you can find estate sales or yard sales with tools. It will get you started and allow you to upgrade as your skill and wallet allow.
Check the classified ads and see if you can't find a decent table saw for around $100
Steve

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The laser light on a RAS is a good idea a laser on a CMS is a good idea a laser on a drill press just seems like a gimmick to me. Its just so easy to spot on a drill press I don't see the need for a laser. Puff

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