Re: new floor boards

Just put them down, and wait awhile. Bout 100 years should do the trick...
Clint

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That should have been thought out ahead of time and been part of the installation. Have the new boards been stained or sealed yet? If not, you can have a lot of fun distressing them and selectively staining them to match. A bunch of kids can add 100 years to a floor in an afternoon if properly instructed. -- Ernie
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hmm .. I'm not sure about how well it will work on pine, but what about ammonia fuming?

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you
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The yellow pine of today does not match the yellow pine of yesterday. Not even close. Better to remove some old wood from a less obvious spot such as a closet and use it in the obvious areas.
M Hamlin

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I've had success using caustic soda (lye) to age pine. Use a saturated solution, paint it on with some rags wired to a stick (it eats brushes), allow to dry, wash off with a mop and water then neuralise any remaining caustic with vinegar. It's very corrosive, so don't get it on your hands or clothes.
HTH
Frank

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Lynn,
Help me clarify something. Have you installed the new pine floor boards yet? This will help a lot.
Jim

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On Fri, 25 Jul 2003 16:48:10 +0000 (UTC), "aceofwands"

BTW, are you sure it is the same kind of pine? I have a "yellow pine" floor in my 100 year old house and when I needed some replacements I had to get recycled boards -- i.e., floor made from wood that had been taken out of old buildings. It wasn't for the aging -- it was because that type of pine is not commercially logged any more. The newly milled flooring matched the original flooring perfectly.
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give 'em to your great great grandson to install.....
Good luck Rob

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Flip the old ones & sand the bejesus out of 'em....

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I added an addition to an old house. We put new oak flooring next to the nearly 100 year old flooring. Both were sanded. A dilute stain was applied to the new boards that made it match the old boards so well, it was hard to see where one started and another began. Also, there was a certain amount of distressing of the new floor to match what we couldn't get out of the old.
Preston

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