RE: Neat Jig Courtesy of WoodSmithShop

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On Thu, 12 Nov 2009 20:55:57 -0800, the infamous "Lew Hodgett"

A Most Excellent idea, sir. Kudos to both you and Woodsmith for sharing it with us, too. That's much safer than running narrow strips next to the fence.
-- You know, in about 40 years, we'll have literally thousands of OLD LADIES running around with TATTOOS, and Rap Music will be the Golden Oldies. Now that's SCARY! --Maxine
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scrawled the following:

Pretty cool for cutting veneers on the BS also.
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scrawled the following:

--
Nonny

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Well done- an excellent idea.
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Nonny

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Sure looks like an good way to waste time.
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A slightly cheaper version that works as well:
http://www.woodworkingtips.com/etips/etip111700wb.html
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It would me much easier and faster to just set the fence once and rip.

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When you are ripping numerious THIN pieces which should be on the wast side you don't have the issue of the the thick waste side pushing into the blade and becoming slightly dished out. And ripping pieces less than 1/4" thick tends to get a bit more dicey as the thin pieces tend to want to drift back into the back of the blade brfore reaaching the splitter if they are against the fence.
Basically you end up pushing the work through fron the waste side when ripping thins strips against the fence. That can cause accumilated problems with each pass, the wast side is no longer straight.
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See my post to Greg.

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CW said:

Except this is for multiple strips/cuts. You'd have to reset the fence accurately each time or cut with the waste on the fence side which is susceptible to "kickback." 1/4" strips are hard to do that way.
Greg G.
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I've turned 6" wide boards into 1/16" strips. Never reset the fence and not even a hint of a problem.

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wrote:

Instead of just "stating it", how about explaining "how" you did it? Otherwise, your statement is a complete waste.
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On Nov 16, 6:03pm, snipped-for-privacy@teksavvy.com wrote:

I do the same thing. I use a zero-clearance insert and a push stick that sits on top of as well as behind the board. I usually rip my edging to a strong 1/8" though, not a sixteenth.
JP
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I do the same thing. I use a zero-clearance insert and a push stick that sits on top of as well as behind the board. I usually rip my edging to a strong 1/8" though, not a sixteenth.
I knew I couldn't be the only one. JP
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I am guessing he may be missing the point. From CW's description I would say that he is simply cutting strips exactly the same way you would rip a 2" wide piece.
But there is a problem with that. Because more push goes agains the waste side, the wast tends to grind a bit more against the blade and thends to loose it's straight edge. OK for a few passes but yesterday I was doing 12 passes from a single 1x6 and surely would have had pieces that were inconsistant in thickness from one end to the other had I cut them against the fence. Been there, done that.
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Leon wrote:

LOL ... different strokes! It's when I don't cut them against the fence that I get inconsistent widths. :)
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Yeah, I do actually use the fence on down to 1/4" under that I go outside the blade and fence. I don't wanna chew up my Gripper. I find that there is the problem of keeping up with the small bit of wood left at the end of the waste side, some times it does not get cut off, sometimes it flares at the end. A few years ago I noticed that the "correct way" to cut veneers according to the Laguna video is to readjust the fence with each pass. I suspect that because you don't/can't use a splitter with a BS the waste side eventually becomes bowed or tapered after several passes. Laguna eventually came up with a solution for adjusting the fence, "an accessory fence". LOL
Pretty cool, it uses an adjustment wheel to move the fence for quick adjustments when cutting veneers on the out side of the blade.
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If you have your push block pushing both sides of the part, how does it cut unequally?
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I don't know, I t just does for me most of the time... I'm not an astro phiziestis,, phyesist, physesis,
Once parts start getting to thin between the fence and blade the push block does not have a lot of grab. YMMV
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No one asked how. Take a 2x4 about 18 inches long. Attach a piece of plywood or whatever is handy to the end so it hangs below the 2x4 by about 1/4 inch. Attach handle to top if desired (recommended). You now have a push block. Set fence, raise blade about 1/8 above stock thickness and push it through using the push block. Keep bloc against fence when doing so. The block pushes both cutoff and waste clear through the blade while holding the stock down. Complete control and no kickback. This technique is at least 40 years old. Probably older but that is the first time I saw it.
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