Re: Is hard maple the hardest wood?



the aren't cherries. If you like bitter, then you would think they are good for eating. The birds evidently think they're good eating. All a matter of taste I suppose.

sap doesn't make good syrup?

invited.
+ + + If you think it will help: go ahead + + +

+ + + That is not so. What we now know as maple was also known as such to the Romans, and to the Greeks before them and propably many before them. When Men came to the New World he found new species of maple, but these clearly were maples. Maples have always been maples (for the last fifty million years or so). At one time the ones with pinnate leaves went into business on their own (Negundo) but this did not last. At the moment there is the question if Dipteronia should be included, but that is it. No other questions.
Prunus has been all over the place and has had its present (wide) circumscription for a decade or two or three or so. Not to be compared to the century (or two) of decades of recognizing maple. Obviously this is because it is unpopular to put plums, peaches, almonds, cherries and the small stuff together. They sure taste different. It is possible that in future Prunus will be split again. I believe there are quite a few people making a living by speculating (read: researching DNA and using lots of statistics) on how 'Prunus' species are related to one another. + + +

+ + + I took a look in a book in a bookstore (Pomona Brittanica) that had it that cherries were found in human habitats archeologically back to the Stone Age. This is not cultivation but association. The wild cherries should occur here natively (according to the local Flora, NL) and do indeed have smaller fruits than nowadays in the shops. No surprise there! + + +

+ + + would be quite surprised if present day orchard trees were hybrids between Prunus avium and Prunus serotina. I could find nothing of the sort, either on the net or in the books at hand. However, stranger things have happened, and plant breeders will stop at nothing ;-) + + +

genus (Cerasus), and Padus serotina / Prunus serotina certainly did not fit in. =====> My sources indicate that Prunus cerasus is the sour cherry. Not good

+ + + Prunus cerasus is the sour cherry. For quite a while it was Cerasus vulgaris. Likely it is not a real species but a hybrid.
Prunus avium is the sweet or wild cherry. For quite a while it was Cerasus avium.
The genus Cerasus counted a few more species but never was a big genus. + + +

=====> Well, is the bird cherry a cherry or not?
+ + + Tell us about the time you tasted Brazilian cherry! + + +

+ + + Nevertheless plums are Prunus too! Prunus also has Prunus cerasifera, the Cherry plum. + + +

+ + + These are called cherries because of the flowers + + +

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schreef

I noticed a lot of variation in the classification at different websites. I think you're right, the geneticists will get the final word (for a while) on the issue.
One thing, er, two actually I'm sure we agree on is that the wood of the black cherry is not much like the wood of the orchard cherry, nor is the fruit.
--

FF

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the black cherry is not much like the wood of the orchard cherry, nor is the fruit.
+ + + Actually the woods are more alike than the fruits and certainly the wood of the black cherry is closer to that of the sweet cherry than to that of "Brazilian cherry" PvR
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