Re: HUMOR: Getting even at Home Depot

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That goes without saying about the design of the parking lot. Many Many of the larger churches I have visited (usually the smaller churches lots are negligible) most of the spaces run parallel to the building and entrance and not perpendicular like at a store.
--
Young Carpenter

"Violin playing and Woodworking are similar, it takes plenty of money,
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I believe that would be the ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act).
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek-at-milmac-dot-com)
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On Mon, 15 Sep 2003 01:46:06 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

I guess I missed it. Can you point me to the paragraph?
Hope ya'll had a nice weekend...
Trent
Proud member of the Roy Rogers fan club!
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Too lazy to do your own web search, huh?
http://www.equal-access.com/ada-codes.html
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek-at-milmac-dot-com)
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On Mon, 15 Sep 2003 16:15:34 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

Lazy?! :)
But I'm gonna try to find the original. A lot of the stuff on his site doesn't come up in my browser...or he printed it wrong.
Hope ya'll have a nice week...
Trent
Proud member of the Roy Rogers fan club!
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On Sun, 14 Sep 2003 21:26:33 GMT, "George"

Not all handicaps involve what you'd think.
Some could be respiratory, etc... The person could get into a Peterbilt if they wanted to.
Barry
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Barry, Agreed.
However, if it was something like a respiratory problem, why would they be eligible for a 'handicap' license plate or placard?
Regards, Ron Magen Backyard Boatshop
in message SNIP

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Ron Magen writes:

Walking any distance can be a problem with severe COPD. Check it out in google.
And smokers who woodwork, check it out and give thought to where you're headed.
Charlie Self
"Integrity without knowledge is weak and useless, and knowledge without integrity is dangerous and dreadful." Samuel Johnson
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Not to mention climbing in and out of humongous trucks.
BTW, as an EMS type, I'm pretty familiar with COPD in the non-filter generation.

be
google.
headed.
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Unfortunately, anyone with *ANY* sort of handicap is eligible for a plate. My 4-year old daughter is theoretically handicapped and I could get a plate for all of my cars and park in handicapped spots any time I wanted, with or without her in the car.
I consider it reprehensible for someone to actually do that though.
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snipped-for-privacy@verizon.net says...

There is a radio talk show host in Dallas whose wife is confined to a wheelchair. Several years ago, he mentioned the looks of sheer hatred when he would pull up to a handicapped space in his van with HC plates, jump out, and walk on two perfectly good legs into a mall or business establishment. Thing was, he was doing so to pick up his wife, whom he had dropped off earlier. Sometimes things aren't as they necessarily appear on first glance.
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Your shortsightedness is blinding.
Both the examples I listed are real life. They live(d) in my house. So, you are telling me that my wife cannot go to the store to choose carpeting, or tile, or paint because she has congestive heart failure? She does not have handicapped placard, but cannot spend much time out under the conditions I mentioned. But she is still very much alive and has a lot of interest in the condition of our home. Our house and the store is air-conditioned so walking in those environments is easy. High humidity is difficult walking, even say, to go about halfway across the parking lot.
My MIL had lung cancer and carried oxygen. She enjoyed getting out also and perusing some of the merchandise. She had her own room and could pick out things she wanted. Unless, of course, you blocked the door to the store.
You really should get your head out of your ass and see what goes on in the community around you. See just how productive seniors and people with illnesses can be. I agree that the ADA goes too far in some places, but it exists because people like you exist.
Best wishes and good health to you and your family. Ed
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wrote:

One more thought...to add to Ed's post...since this thread seemed to start somewhere at Home Depot... :)
There's a guy that works at one of the Home Depots in my area. He's in a wheel chair...and he works mainly the plumbing department.
He's really one hellova guy. He's not handicapped at all...just physically challenged. I kid him whenever I get the chance about getting off his dead ass and doin' some work! :) And he jumps right back at me...no respect for the customer at all. He'll show ya where the part is you need...and sometimes he'll point to it for you with a laser beam. But you get the part YOURSELF...or you walk out without it!
He works harder than most of the youngins there...and I'm sure he's proud of the check he takes home each week. He's able to work for the check he gets...and he seems damn proud of the job he does. And he should be.
And I've gotta hand it to Home Depot, too. There's not many retailers that'll hire someone handicapped...and put them in the front lines with the customers.
Somebody here questioned my sensitivity regarding the handicapped...although I did put a 'lol' at the end of my post. But I DON'T feel sorry for them...or at least try not to show it. They get that attitude WAY too often from other people.
Handicapped folks don't want to be treated as inferior. All they really want is an even break in life...to be treated fairly.
I always try to make fun of folks with walkers...but in a NICE way. Even handicapped folks have a sense of humor...but sometimes its hard for them to find it...with all the tribulations they go thru with their problems. So I DON'T treat them like they're different. At least I try not to.
The Home Depot guy certainly doesn't want any pity...and he sure in hell doesn't get it from me. If he wanted pity, he could just sit at home and draw a government check.
Hope ya'll have a nice week...
Trent
Proud member of the Roy Rogers fan club!
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com says...

Hey! You just reminded me that there is a guy that works at our local Lowe's that is in a wheel chair AND works in the plumbing department. Weird coincidence. He knows his stuff too. I can go there with just a vague idea of what I need, and he will zoom off in his chair and find exactly what I need, no hesitation at all. Great guy. I forget he's in a wheelchair sometimes.
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When in my local Borg yesterday, I saw a salesguy with an odd way of walking. I listened to him explaining things to a customer and figured he quite possibly used to be a construction worker. I'd hazard a WAG that his walking style may have been the result of a workplace injury.
Why wouldn't these stores snap up ex-construction/plumber/whatever workers who are knowledgable in their fields and who have suffered an accident rendering them incapable of continuing in their old job? It's a win-win - Borg gets experience and knowledge at a lower price than competing with the construction industry directly and a disabled employee gets a job where they can use their expertise.
Mike
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On 16 Sep 2003 12:20:15 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Larry Bud) wrote:

This post is so stupid I thought my head was going to explode.
People shop for all kinds of things at home improvement stores that are either light and small, or delivered. Almost anything these places sell is available installed, and much of the custom stuff, like counter tops, are ordered for later delivery.
Barry
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Larry Bud) wrote in message

No, the real question is "Why do you suppose someone else's reason for going to a store is any of your damn business?"
But, strictly as an exercise, imagine yourself doing some home improvements for a disabled friend or family member who goes to HD with you to pick out the materials.
--

FF

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Or learning-disabled -- they can't read.
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek-at-milmac-dot-com)
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snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com says...

My favorite was several years ago. Shortly upon moving to Tucson, I went to the post office to get mail out of the PO box. It was fairly early in the morning and I encountered a rather frantic lady on the way out wanting to know whether I had a cell phone or knew of a locksmith to help her get into her car, she had locked her keys in it, with the engine running (it was hot and she had left the car running to keep the AC running). I indicated I did not have a phone and pointed her to the firestation across the street where she might get some help. She looked a little dejected, but thanked me for the help.
It wasn't until I was driving away that I realized she was so frantic because she had parked in a handicapped space (the one closest to the door while she ran inside, "for just a second").
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B a r r y B u r k e J r . wrote:

Not very likely. I find it difficult to imagine that someone could be in bad enough shape to qualify for a handicapped tag/sticker/plate and still be fit enough to pass the DOT physical.
Oh, wait, you were saying they might be physically _capable_ of getting into a Peterbilt. Nevermind.
Actually, they're probably easier to ascend than some of those honking big pickem-up trucks. More steps. Pro'ly 'cause the typical American truck driver is slightly to very overweight and has less upper body strength than a 12-year-old girl from holding onto that namby pamby power steering all day. 80,000 pounds, but you can steer it with your belly.
(I should know... I tried to do a pull-up the other day, and I couldn't lift myself even 1/4". It was humiliating. I can leg press 10 reps of 500 pounds though. Or at least I usta could, before I hyperextended my knee.)
--
Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
Linux fanatic, and certified Geek; registered Linux user #243621
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