Re: How hot is too hot? How cold is too cold?

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NoOne N Particular wrote: ...

Depends...
Ventilation, shade, humidity, work level, etc., etc., etc., ...
My general rule is 100F is hot, 105F is HOT, 110F+ is too hot for anything except that which MUST be done (and a farmer's work is never done, either)...
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While not applicable to cold, the following make working when it's hot semi-OK
Attitude - when you're laying on the beach in Maui and it's 98 degrees that's no problem brah. So a sound generator doing waves and sea gull cries can help.
Create a breeze - even a little breeze makes you feel cooler - so a simple fan - set on low so as not to blow stuff around - helps.
Loose clothes - people in the middle east don't go with tank tops or tight shirts or pants for a reason.
Stay ahead of thirst. When it's hot, by the time you feel thirsty you're already dehydrated. Lots of fluids, preferably without caffiene or salt will let you keep working - without falling down every once in a while.
Music selection - just about any Christmas album. Think "cold", feel cooler.
"It's not the heat, but the humidity, that gets you." - yeah right.
charlie b (if you want temperature extremes - head for Central Texas - 30 degree low, 105 degree high the next day, then hail the next day followed by a week of cloudless 100 -107 degree days. Then there's a frost. Wait a day or two and you've got lightening storms you can't imagine 'til you've experienced it, with torrential rains - blowing horizontally by 40-50 mph winds. Did I mention the wasps and locust? I think God does all his testing for things to get sinners' attention in Central Texas)
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charlieb wrote: ...

In general, don't disagree, but that's a pretty apt description of anywhere on the High Plains from W TX to SK, not _just_ wherever you are in TX... :)
While extremes are common here, too, (SW KS) along w/ all the other niceties you mention, I'd like to see the weather record of the day that had a 30F low w/ a 105F high... :) That's a TX exaggeration, I'm thinking! :)
(Greatest 24 hr swing I can recall is from roughly 100F to low 40s during spring chinooks or cold fronts.) I can't recall ever having an actual frost on the day of or before a 100-deg buster.
Wonder if the NWS has a searchable archive for that kind of trivia??? Never actually looked for it, but would be kinda' interesting...
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dpb wrote:

Well I'm not from Texas but it sounds like a good place to be FROM. :-) I was raised in Albuquerque so I know a little about the weather swings. I can remember waking up to beautiful bright sunny skies and in a couple of hours it would be raining so hard that we truly could not see the houses across the street. Then two hours later everything is nice and clear, warm and DRY. I can also remember looking out into the deserts in the west and seeing huge clouds of blowing sand coming our way. We would have to go inside and close all the windows (and chink them in some places) and ride out the dust storms. I hated those. Imagine being in a house that you have had to seal against the sand and this house has no ventilation of any kind. No Swamp cooler or even fans.
Out here in Oakley, (California's newest city about 60 miles inland from San Francisco along the San Joaquin River) it is quite different. We are just on the western side of the interior valley and summers are just about always clear and hot with, at most, about a 40 degree swing in temps. Summer highs probably would average out to be in the 100 to 105 range and the lows at night would be from 70 to about 75 or so. The highest temp I have seen is a 117 on two or three bank signs. Don't know how accurate the signs were but it was HOT HOT HOT!!! Humidity be damned. 110's and 112's are not nearly rare enough. :-) You'd think that the evenings would be great, and they would be except for mosquitoes in the two hours surrounding sunset. Winter high temps are usually in the fifties with occasional dips into the 40's. Winter lows rarely ever go below freezing but we have had some mid twenties.
One of the things that gets me the most is the "delta breezes". You get up in the morning and the weather is beautiful. Clear skies, moderate temps, and no wind. Then about 1:00 or 1:30 you will feel a slight puff of wind on your face, but it doesn't stop. The wind speed just keeps building until about sunset and by that time it is 20-25 mph. As soon as the sun sets the breezes start to diminish and within an hour they are gone.
Well anyway, It is now 1:30 in the afternoon and we have a 101 degrees outside right now with about two and a half hours to go until the hottest part of the day. I hafta go sit on the a/c vent with a brewski.
Wayne

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NoOne N Particular wrote:

The mountains generate weather in high country, yes, and it is indeed quite variable.
Don't need to tell somebody in the center of what was the 30s what blowing dirt is, either... :( While I'm not _that_ old :) I do remember the 50s that were a mini-version.
Your CA "delta breezes" are a poor cousin of the High Plains heating-generated winds we have. 20-30 is still pretty near "calm" in our dictionary :)
While it sounds bad, the nice days are really appreciated for one and who wants the same ol' same ol' every day, anyway? :)
When in TN/VA I really missed two things -- seeing the horizon and the massive building of thunderstorms. Of course, once in a while they get just a little out of hand, but... :)
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30,000 Btu Reddy Heater, propane. Good for what I do, but not enough for truly cold days, thus the 15 degree limit. I did insulate the walls last year and that helps.
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On Thu, 05 Jul 2007 18:34:33 GMT, NoOne N Particular
I am fortunate to have an air-conditioned shop where it is kept about 76 degrees in the summer. But, when doing outdoor work anything over the 90-degree mark I struggle after 30 minutes. I prefer to avoid the outdoors from 1 to 4 PM during the summer. I don't feel cold until the (room) temperature drops to below 62, and I dislike going outdoors for more than 20 minutes when the temperature rises above 100 or dips below 10. Excessive heat wears me out (I have a couple attic jobs on hold until fall).
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I suggest you bend the needle on the thermometer of your gague so that when the actual temperature is 100 or so, it only reads 90. That should solve your problem on most days.
--
The best argument against democracy is a five-minute conversation
with the average voter. (Winston Churchill)
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NoOne N Particular wrote:
| last year I bought a clock for the garop that has time, | temperature, and humidity dials on it.
Hang a small mirror at eye level alongside your clock and make a habit of taking a quick glance at it - it can provide advance warning of heat stroke/exhaustion.
Any significant deviation from your normal skin coloration is a signal to take an _immediate_ pause for fluids and cooling.
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto /
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"Morris Dovey" wrote in message

LOL ... gee, thanks! Normally a dark white, so I'm told, I'm barely able to tell the red 3's in Canasta when the lighting is just right, so I guess I'll have to stick to fainting over the table saw as an indicator in these hot Houston summers. :)
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And fortunately this summer Houston has be MILD. I heard a couple of days ago that in Houston the high temperature for the first 2 days in July had set a 120 year record of being the lowest Highs.
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Swingman wrote: | "Morris Dovey" wrote in message | || Any significant deviation from your normal skin coloration is a || signal to take an _immediate_ pause for fluids and cooling. | | LOL ... gee, thanks! Normally a dark white, so I'm told, I'm barely | able to tell the red 3's in Canasta when the lighting is just | right, so I guess I'll have to stick to fainting over the table saw | as an indicator in these hot Houston summers. :)
Hmm. That's a tough one. The only other clue that I know to watch for is having really dry skin in situations when you know you should be sweating like a hog. I remember from earlier days that the people from Texas weren't any less vulnerable than the folks from New Jersey - and I recall that a number of Aramcons didn't survive rapid transitions from A/C to outdoor (and outdoor to A/C) temperatures.
Although it probably doesn't apply to you or me, vulnerability increases with age...
:-)
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto /
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Its too hot when your sweat keeps dripping on your project wood.
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Leon wrote:

No, it's too humid when your sweat _drips_ at all -- in any reasonable locale it's supposed to evaporate in place! :)
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Evaporate????? That is a scarce word in Houston.
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RE: Subject
Had a very high tech sailing instrument taped to the mast of the boat.
It was a glass tube filled with mercury called a thermometer.
When it got to 80F, it was time to sail South.
When it got to 60F, it was time to sail North.
Lew
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

That sounds just bass ackwards to me. I'm assuming that you are in the northern hemisphere sailing north when it gets up to 80, so you go south to get cooler????? Are you down under???
Wayne
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NoOne N Particular wrote:
> That sounds just bass ackwards to me. I'm assuming that you are in the > northern hemisphere sailing north when it gets up to 80, so you go south > to get cooler????? Are you down under??? >
Somebody's reading.
You pass the test<G>.
Lew
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Leon wrote:

I said _reasonable_. Houston (actually, anywhere along the Gulf Coast or deep SE) doesn't fit my definition of reasonable for non-winter months, anyway... :)
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Thu, Jul 5, 2007, 6:34pm (EDT+4) snipped-for-privacy@pacbell.net (NoOneNParticular) did burble: I was in my garop <SNIP of a buncha stuff>
So you're a sissy.
JOAT If a man does his best, what else is there? - General George S. Patton
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