Re: Harbor Freight 6" jointer

I know you aren't asking me but I have this jointer and your idea is exactly what I did years ago. Works pretty well, too. Worth the trouble. I didn't see any reason to make it removable and used pop rivets. A little duct tape around the plastic for a seal and ready to go.
Jim
(Adguru) wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Finished the dust collector attachment and it works like a charm. Got a 12" tablesaw flat connector. Put some 1.5" wide weather-stripping all along the edge.Drilled three holes for some screen latches - the kind that have a little tab that swings over the screen edge to hold a screen in a door etc. It swings over the edge of the tablesaw connection and holds it tight to the weather-stripping. Fired her up and jointed away and all the shavings went into the DC as planned. To quote the "A Team" - "I love it when a plan comes together".
Vic
(Adguru) wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I have had a HF 6" jointer for 6+ years now. It is one of the most used tools in my shop. I have only moved the fence a few times. When I clamp down the fence on mine it likes to tilt a bit while tightening. No biggie, it stays put once set.
For dust collection I have been using a piece of stove pipe flashing. It is about 12" x 12" and is made to go over a stove pipe on a roof. It has a cone shaped chute and my 4" flex tubing fits on it nicely. Mounting is a little tricky, 4 pieces of duct tape and it has never fallen off. I have never had a clog.
I made a jig and use the scarey sharp system to sharpen the knives. Works great and is less work than buying more knives or taking the old knives to the sharpener.
I have not found a reason to purchase a nicer 6" jointer but a 10" long bed would be nice.
(Adguru) wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Care to share your jig details??
(Adguru) wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I made a real simple jig out of 3 scrap pieces of Ipe. I put the jointer knife on my table saw and held the bevel against the table surface and set my table saw at the same angle. I ripped a piece of Ipe at this angle. I then lowered the blade and moved the fence in a little to make a grove just under the width of the knife. I used a couple of nuts and bolts to fasten the top piece to the first piece and clamp the knife. The third piece is held on with screws and the holes are oblong to allow for a little angle adjustment. I used a screw on each side to mount some roller bearings. A piece of card board at the top was just thick enough to clamp the knife nice and tight without any movement.
I just clamp the blade in the jig and move the jig back and forth over sandpaper glued to glass. It makes a better edge than I have ever recieved from a sharpening service. Side View. /\ Cardboard / \ / / / / / / //\ / / // \ / / / \ / / / \ / / / \ / / \ / /-\ / / /\ / / / \ / / / / / / / /-\ \ /__/ / / /______/ /_( o )_\ /_/ \_/ Roller bearing Knife
(Adguru) wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
One trick I've seen and used on mine is to get a pair of those arrow shaped welding magnets whose point is 90 degrees, and stick them between the fence and the tables. Harbor Freight has them for $1/ea every now and again.
They'll hold the fence securely in place while tightening; no guesswork and it works every time (ok, both of the two times I've done it since the fence typically stays put.)
The same magnets can be used to adjust the height of the blades by resting them on the edge of the outfeed table, sticking out over the edge over the blade. Loosening the hold-down bolts allows the blade to move and stick to the edge of the magnet (one magnet for each end of the blade is needed). It's now level with the outfeed table, and can be tightened at your leisure.
On a related question, the knives that come with this jointer are plain carbon steel and dull quickly. They scary sharpen pretty sharp, but harder blades would be more convenient. Does anybody have recommendations for high speed steel knives for this machine?
...John
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Oughtsix) wrote in message

One trick I've seen and used on mine is to get a pair of those arrow shaped welding magnets whose point is 90 degrees, and stick them between the fence and the tables. Harbor Freight has them for $1/ea every now and again.
They'll hold the fence securely in place while tightening; no guesswork and it works every time (ok, both of the two times I've done it since the fence typically stays put.)
The same magnets can be used to adjust the height of the blades by resting them on the edge of the outfeed table, sticking out over the edge over the blade. Loosening the hold-down bolts allows the blade to move and stick to the edge of the magnet (one magnet for each end of the blade is needed). It's now level with the outfeed table, and can be tightened at your leisure.
On a related question, the knives that come with this jointer are plain carbon steel and dull quickly. They scary sharpen pretty sharp, but harder blades would be more convenient. Does anybody have recommendations for high speed steel knives for this machine?
...John
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.