RE; Glue Technique

Nailshooter41 said; On another track, I am a big fan of the old school liquid nails, but about 3 years ago tried the polyurethane tube glues. They seem to hold like hell, fill in gaps well, and dry hard and completely water resistant. The only downside is the tendency to creep and for the glue to seep out of the joints.
Is the creep after the poly glue sets? Or before, as in sliding around.
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wrote:

Recall we are talking about poly in a tube.
It doesn't move anymore than regular Liquid Nails, PL400, and their cousins while laying up a big project (glued sandwich beam, headers, etc.).
No matter what I do though, it has this habit of ooze. I can clamp/ screw/nail a repair, and have little or no squeeze out. I come back the next day, and the squeezed out doubles. Over large joints, it might triple.
Example: Since it sticks to just about anything, I recently used it to put a stiffener in a drawer bottom for a client. The bottom material was too thin, and the large drawer was overloaded for years.
I cut a piece of 2X2 and sanded it smooth. I applied a long, thin bead of glue across the width of the stiffener (the drawer was a 32" wide model) and screwed through the sides, and then through the bottom (tightly- screws every 4") into the stiffener so the screws wouldn't be seen.
The next day, there was a small line of ooze that crept out overnight. It wasn't that way when I left at the end of the day.
Because of it's toughness, I used the same glue to adhere stiffeners, braces and repair pieces to the bases of some craft style furniture that was in need of help. Due to the rough original fits of the joints and their current poor condition, I chose the poly glue for its ability to gap fill those irregular, dirty surfaces. Same results; no squeeze out for a couple of hours. Many hours later... squeeze out.
Like I said, I really like the stuff and use it when needed. But you have to remember what you are using it for and realize its capabilities as well as its limitations.
The completely waterproof feature and the outright toughness of this glue gives it a space in the truck box for me. Robert
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Poly glues expand as they absorb moisture so I suppose what you are seeing is a slow absorbtion of moisture from the material and humidity thus a slow expansion. I also suppose if you et the joint first the expansion will happen right away and you can wipe or scrape away the squeeze. Some polys require you to wet it first right?
wrote:

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Again, recall we are talking about poly in a tube, NOT Gorilla or Elmer's in a bottle. I personally can't stand those glues, anyway. I can never get them to behave really well.
This is what I am speaking of, and again, it is in a tube.
<http://www.liquidnails.com/products/product.jsp?productId=54
or if munged:
http://tinyurl.com/9qqtlp
No wetting is necessary, and in fact moisture on the surfaces would probably cause the initial adherence to fail.
Robert
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Point taken and this was only speculation on my part. The technical data sheet does indicate "moisture cure" and all the poly glues (that require wetting) always expand as the mositure acting as a catalyst (sp?) starts to cure the glue. The data sheet also indicates that humidity is one of the factors in how long the glue takes to cure so just speculating.
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SNIP

All of those things could be a consideration, and could actually make some sense too, when observing the way the glue works.
Down here in sunny South Texas, it isn't unusual to have 80%+ (easily more!) humidity for months in a row. I have a tendency to take that for granted.
Robert
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All of those things could be a consideration, and could actually make some sense too, when observing the way the glue works.
Down here in sunny South Texas, it isn't unusual to have 80%+ (easily more!) humidity for months in a row. I have a tendency to take that for granted.
Robert
Thanks, S. TX. huh? Marble Falls here, (when I'm home)
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wrote:

Hey... practically neighbors!
(At least in Texas anyway!)
Robert
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Yep - you are between us.
Martin in Lufkin. (once Round Rock, Arlington, El Paso....)
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