Re: Fence Choices



Agreed that side pressure should be minimal, but why risk it happening at all? I've noticed that with the fences that clamp down just at the front, the single rail is much more massive than the Excalibur type with clamping down on both sides. Both sides clamping just seems more efficient. Part of my concern is that I use a wheelchair and with the width of the front clamping only type, the thickness of the rail would preclude a few extra inches from me getting as close to my work as possible. I've got quite a few years working with a tablesaw, so I guess I'm going to have to view the front clamping type in person and make a choice at that point.
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and may suite your needs better. But, going back the the single clamp issue on the Beis style fences, the fence "T" section is about 12" wide where it rides along the front rail and tends to be very sturdy ESPECIALLY at the front of the saw where most of the pushing is going to be. If you go to the far back end and try to wiggle the fence, it does indeed move if you watch carefully but again you are not going to be wiggleing the back end of the fence when cutting wood. I have used this type fence for about 7 or 8 years and have never had a fence deflection problem. With a Forrest WWII, 95% of my rips look better than the edge produced on a jointer.
With exception of the Excalibur probably, many fences that clamp in front and back have a bad habit of being square until you lock the fence down. This very often will pull the fence out of parallel with the blade.
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I guess that's a point for the Bies and likely depends on quality construction. Locking down simultaneously at front and back might well cause the problem I'm attributing to a front only system although it happened very rarely with the Excalibur and only when the clamping pressure was set too high.. I guess it's going to come down to how comfortable I feel when in front of a single rail fence system. Admittedly, I've hear nothing but good things about biesemeyer fences. (haven't yet actually seen one that I could play with) Also, an advantage over a dual rail system is having an outfeed table butted right up against the tabletop; something that would definitely be advantageous to my needs.
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Bear in mind that many Bies-style fences still have a rear rail that the fence glides on, so the fence ends up sitting just proud of the TS surface. You still have to work around that with the outfeed table.
Scroll down on this page to see for yourself: http://www.biesemeyer.com/home_fence/home_main_page2.htm
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Not so.. The Beis and clones have a back rail to support the extension table and mounts below that surface. The fence rides along the front rail and the TS table and Extension.
Reread the link you posted and scroll down to questions and answers. You will see,
Does the fence clamp or ride on the back rail? No. The fence locks to the front guide only using a three-point locking system. When the locking handle is lowered the fence automatically aligns itself exactly parallel to the blade providing an extremely clean cut. And, you can fully depend on the hairline pointer to provide accuracy to 1/64th of an inch
Do I need an extension table? Yes. The fence is supported by the front guide and the extension table. You are provided with a drawing and instructions on how to build an extension table, or you can purchase one directly from your dealer.
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Leon wrote:

No, my PM-64A Biesie clone has a glide that rides on the rear rail, 1-1/8" x 1-1/8" angle iron IIRC. It wasn't difficult for me to create a way to mount an outfeed table though.
Scott
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Right you are Scott, IIRC the Powermatic fences did or still do offer a rear lock down for the fence. All the other clones and the Beis ride on the table top. I stand corrected on that count.
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On Thu, 24 Jul 2003 20:29:47 GMT, "Upscale"

as an Excalibur owner, i would say, stick with what works, and works well.
Traves
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