Re: Do I want a shaper?

On Wed, 10 Sep 2003 13:57:36 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@gemtechservice.com (Jerry McCaffrey) wrote:

I have a shop-built router table with dust collection and a PC 3.25 HP router. This setup is much more versatile than a shaper.
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Jerry McCaffrey wrote:

My condolences.

Agreed.
The PC router and table would function well. From past experience I will not buy another Reliant tool.
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA
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On Wed, 10 Sep 2003 13:57:36 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@gemtechservice.com (Jerry McCaffrey) wrote:

One problem with shapers is their slow speed. Fine if you only use big panel-raising bits, but it can give a poor finish on a more typical diameter of bit. Check the max speed before you buy.
Personally I'd go for a spindle moulder. I can find a S/H industrial moulder more easily than I'd find a shaper, and the price is good.
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On Wed, 10 Sep 2003 21:10:49 +0100, Andy Dingley

Andy, we have here another case of two countries separated by a common language. In North America, what is referred to as a shaper is what you call a spindle moulder. I just checked in my "Woodworker's Dictionary" (by Vic Taylor) which has 3 definitions of shaper.
The first refers to a kind of rasp (which sounds like a Surform tool)
The second is:
"(USA) A spindle moulder (q.v.)" [Which describes a shaper as I know it]
The third is: "This is an industrial machine which uses the principle of the spindle moulder to shape a wide variety of wooden parts, including . . . A spindle with a cutting tool on its lower end is mounted on a pivoted arm which is free to swing either inwards or outwards relative to the workpiece. The latter has a templet fixed to its underside and the set-up is mounted on large rotating table. There is a roller collar beneath the cutting tool which follows the templet during the cut, and as it does so the pivoted arms swing inwards or outwards."
Sounds like an overarm router to me, but those usually work with a pin. Anyone with a better term? Luigi Replace "no" with "yk" twice in reply address for real email address
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wrote:

Maybe, but I think it's just sloppy wording in the US - the makers use the same terminology we do.
Shapers are big heavy machines that take router cutters in a collet chuck. Spindle moulders have an arbor instead of a chuck, and take a moulding head. Table routers are like lightweight shapers. Some shapers can also take a lightweight moulding head.
The big advantage of the moulding head is the cheap tooling by swapping simple knives. You can make your own with a grinder and a simple balancing jig.
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Not so, at least not in the US -- what you call a spindle moulder, everybody here, including the manufacturers, calls a shaper.
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek-at-milmac-dot-com)
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Jerry:
For whatever it may be worth to you; I think Mr. Vogler is correct in that there ARE jobs that ONLY make sense on ONE or the other - not either!
I have both and use both - but rarely interchangeably.
There IS a valid place for both machines, at least in this case!
Warmly, Griz
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On Wed, 10 Sep 2003 13:57:36 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@gemtechservice.com (Jerry McCaffrey) wrote:
"I'm currently using an old craftsman router mounted in a cheapo table. A new "PC router, base, and Norm-like cabinet would cost about the same as a used "Reliant shaper. Advantages of each or suggestions are appreciated. " "Thanks "Jerry
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