Re: Dead Miter Saw: electrical ?

On Wed, 30 Jul 2003 19:57:59 -0700, Kim Whitmyre

Most likely the switch has seen its day. Most problems I run into have been power cords.. this is still a possibility as well.
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Too easy. I don't see how the switch can blow a breaker, unless a wire falls off and shorts to the other side of the line.
Hitting the switch while the saw is coasting shouldn't cause any more current surge than starting from stopped. In fact, the surge will be reduced, so I don't see why your action should have caused the problem.
I'm not sure how that motor is wound, but if it is a compound winding, with the field in parallel with the armature, a bad brush contact would do what you report. If it's series wound, all current must go through the brushes and a bad brush would cause complete deadness.
The symptom is typical of shorted turns in the winding. That's a random occurrence and probably means curtains, since parts are so expensive. Repair would consist of either replacement of the field assembly (stationary windings) or the whole motor.
Wilson
wrote:

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Don't all these type saws have the electrical brake on them ? When the switch is released it disconnects the power from the mains but then uses the EMF (if that's the correct term) of the motor windings to charge a capacitor or some kind of reverse winding to apply a reverse current flow to stop the blade. So a bad switch is a real possibility and/or a bad cap (or other device) used in the braking mechanism.
Bob S.
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