re-creating a tongue and groove piece of oak

I'm refinishing a very old dresser that has water damage and probably 1/8" of paint layers from repainting over the years. The oak is tongue and groove and I have a few pieces that are warped beyond repair from the water damage. I'm now forced with recreating this piece and don't know how to make a tongue and groove joinery. The wood is probably 1/4 inch thick by the way if that matters and the tonge and groove is very thin. Help!!
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Using a 1/8" kerf blade and a sacrificial vertical fence attached to your TS, set the fence so the blade is buried in the sacrificial fence by 1/16". Set the height of the blade to about 1/8". This will remove 1/16" wide by 1/8" deep rabbet from one side. Flip the board and take another pass to form the 1/8" wide by 1/8" deep tongue.
Now make a groove in the mating board edge by centering the piece over the blade. That means the fence will be positioned 1/16" away from the blade now. Make a pass at a depth of 1/8" plus an RCH for glue.
I have to ask why you want to replicate a T&G in a 1/4" thick (whatever)? Is this a panel on the side or what?
I'm assuming the T&G was used to align two pieces together only and the T&G is hidden. If their is a decorative bevel to the T&G, then a bench plane, sanding block or another pass at the table saw with the blade beveled will do.
If not, forget the T&G and just glue as you would for making any panel and use some culls to keep it flat while the glue dries. Today's glues are much stronger than the old hide glues. But if you want to remain true to the construction of the period, make the T&G and use some Franklin's hide glue or mix your own.
You could also make T&G with a router mounted in a router table.
Bob S.

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snipped-for-privacy@cox.net (Basspro*) wrote in

Hum - the traditional way to do that would be to use a match plane. There are router bits for T & G, but I don't know that any of them would handle 1/4" stock.
If I were trying to do this, I think I'd use the table saw to cut a 1/8" kerf (or 3/32" if you have a narrow kerf blade) to serve as the groove, and a rabbet plane to cut the tongue.
If you need to match the existing T & G, and that has a groove narrower than your saw's kerf, I'm not sure what to do. If it's wider, of course you can take two passes to make a wider kerf (incidently, this calls for a zero clearance insert and a feather board, & I'd use a sacrificial fence, just for safety).
If the existing T & G has a bead or other ornament alongside the tongue, a scratchstock or a hand-beader will serve to duplicate it.
John
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On Thu, 22 Jan 2004 17:22:32 +0000 (UTC), John McCoy

I made a run of thin T&G recently. I ended up with a thickness of about 3/8". I used stacked 2 wing slot cutters on the router to cut both the tongue and groove. it worked fine.     Bridger
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