Re: Craftsman new hybrid saws on sale


I just bought the 22124 and mobile base. With C-club, sale and delivery $789.99 before tax and am waiting on a $60.00 rebate. I looked at Delta & General (local dealer) and read all I could on Grizzly and Powermatic. I'm graduating from 25yrs with a Shopsmith and cannot believe how much easier a big, stays in place table, is to use. I've been doing woodworking for 25 yrs, but since I'm not a pro, I probably have 1 yr experience repeated 25 times!
3 horse, 3 belts are probably bare minimums for a cabinet shop but too much for me. What sold me was Sear's, try it; see if you like it policy. And so far, I like it. The blade/table alignment was perfect out of the box. The fence cursor screw holes didn't match up, but Bessy says they will send a new replacement. The Sears guys put mine right in the shop for me.
I do have 1 question though. Are all cabinet saws quiet? My neighbor has a Sears contractor saw and a friend has a JET saw and I have a Shopsmith. It is impossible to talk over the noise of either. This 22124 is so quiet ripping oak that you can speak normally. Scary actually!
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I'd really appreciate a follow-up post in a few months. I'm probably going to be purchasing a cabinet saw in about 3-4 months, and I'd really like to hear if your opinions are still as positive after a few months of use. So if you remember, post an update sometime after the New Year.
Thanks
BruceT

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I have one of those Cman hybrids. It was (and I think still is) the best value out there. Not perfect by a long shot. The table has visible low spots. Much of the tapping and threading is poorly done and results in screws that are too tight (or in one case too loose and needed to be upsized).
However...
After *thoroughly* setting the saw up (which takes all day) it works exceptionally well for what it is. I was able to get tolerances higher than I expected for blade to miter slot parallel, blade face square to table, and fence parallel to blade. The fence is not a Biesemeyer, but it is a good fence within limits. I have been able to rip a consistent width to a tolerance of a few thousandths pretty much every time I use it. This is sufficient to edge-glue a panel, and would only require a few passes with the jointer plane to make it really dead-on.
I use the guard. I think the reason why many people don't use them is that is spoils the cut. After analyzing the construction of the guard I concluded that you must place your straightedge along the fence-side of the blade to align the guard. This has the effect of causing the splitter to direct the cut workpiece into the fence rather than away from it. The splitter is slightly thinner than the standard blade kerf, so you must make a choice as to which side of the blade you reference on. Use the fence-side.
For a very thin workpiece I don't use the guard, but then I drop in a Delta sized zero-clearance insert. I intend to rig a splitter to it. also for small thicknesses, avoid the guard, the workpiece could jam beneath the splitter supports.
With the WWII (standard kerf), the saw passes the nickel test, and cuts through maple and purpleheart quite easily.
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