Re: Compressed air lines PRICES

There has been some discussion over the prices I paid for the fittings and pipe for the compressed air lines. Below is a breakdown in AU$ with US$ equivalent alongside:
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Polair Polypropylene products
Poly pipe 25mm x 6m (4 @ $29) $116 (US$88.38) Poly threaded Tee 25mm x 1/2     (5 @ $11) $55 (US$41.90) Poly threaded end 25mm x 1/2     (3 @ $8) $24 (US$18.29) Poly elbow 25mm equal         (3 @ $10) $30 (US$22.83) Poly threaded elbow 25mm x 1/2     (1 @ $8.70) $8.70 (US$6.62) Poly clip 25mm             (20 @ $2) $40 (US$30.45)
general air fitting and hardware
reducing nipples 1/2 to 1/4 brass (4 @ $2.90) $11.60 (US$8.82) ball valve 1/4 F-F yellow handle (3 @ $10) $30.00 (US$22.83) nitto coupling 1/2 male         (5 @ $15) $75.00 (US$57.09) nitto coupling 1/4 male         (1 @ $14) $14.00 (US$10.66) Ramset wall screws 12G x 50 mm     (1 @ $7) $7.00 (US$5.33)
Total $411.30 (US$313.08)
Less US$22 for one length of pipe returned surplus (US$291.08)
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This is my second post within this thread...
I will have to retract (for now) what I said in my first post...at least until I do a little research on Polyethelene .. PVC is something I would never use for air lines.. have to withoold my judgement on polyethelene...
BUT black pipe is still my choice. at this time...
Bob Griffiths ... .
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On Thu, 06 Jan 2005 11:11:56 -0500, Bob G.
remove ns from my header address to reply via email

PE is semi-soft, and extremely tough. My truck has PE airlines all over it for brakes etc. To be rated for air, at 1" it will probably be quite thick as well. _If_ it bursts, it will simply split open, with very little if any shrapnel. There would be danger of the pipe flying away under pressure if not securely anchored.
Any flexible airline is a far greater danger in the shop. I had one where the end fitting came off. It had a tankful of 150 PSI air to help it along. Luckily it wrapped itself after only 10 long seconds. I left the shed and waited for it to work itself out. Luckily it was only a small compressor, which could not keep up the pressure.
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On Thu, 06 Jan 2005 11:11:56 -0500, Bob G.

I agree with you about PVC, a dangerous way to go. The polyethlene is more like ,umm, I guess a solid rubber tyre is the closest I can come to describing its consistency. I know it won't shatter as it has that 'rubbery' feel that tells you it will split rather than shatter. It also is able to twist (say 60 deg over 10') and bend (say 30 deg over 10') which is very handy when installing.
Greg
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Lots of places going to copper. No threading, easier to cut into if you want to make changes in the middle of a run.
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