Re: Best infant formula for newborns

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When I used formula, I used Enfamil with iron. I wouldn't trust the new formulas that are out there, as they are too new.
--
Sue (mom to three girls)



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My infant son was in the hospital when he was 7 weeks hold and I asked the local doctors and nurses the same question. They replied that all major formula brands are more or less the same beside what the manufactures may claim.
Whether thats true or not who am I to say.
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When foster parenting, I found that Good Start (regular, not soy) was best tolerated. At that point, they didn't have the "plus" available or I would have gotten it.
My reason for switching to Good Start first when Enfamil was *clearly* not being tolerated well was that Good Start, rather than having both whole casien protien and whole whey protien, uses a hydrolysate whey protein only. It's not quite as hypoallergenic as, say, Nutramigen, but it's a hell of a lot cheaper and less smelly, too. And was tolerated better in that one baby than the whole protein formulas.
Lactose-free is rarely needed or helpful--babies are supposed to be able to digest lactose and it is a rare kid who is truly lactose intolerant as a baby. Iron-enriched is a good idea. Enriched with dha, etc. is a good idea. Soy is generally a bad idea unless you absolutely must. When breastmilk is not available, a milk-based, iron-enriched, lactose-containing formula is the first choice. The only reason to switch away from that is if baby isn't tolerating it well. Every time you take something out, you're getting farther away from the attempt to mimic breastmilk. For example, if you take out lactose, you have to substitute in some other sugar. Lactose is one of the more complex, less "sweet" sugars out there... and simpler sugars stress the system more. I didn't mind taking out casien--cow milk actually contains far more casein than human milk does--which is part of why it makes bigger, tougher curds in the tummy. Iron is important for formula-fed babies because if there is a hidden intolerance to the milk protein, some minor blood loss can occur in the intestines, which tends to deplete the iron stores faster. So unless the iron is causing a LOT of constipation (which on good start, we never had a probelm with) then you really should use an iron-fortified formula. Soy has a lot of phytoestrogens in it, and is just not the ideal thing to feed to a baby who is capable of taking in a milk-based formula. Plus, some babies who are allergic to milk are *also* allergic to soy--which is one reason I leaned toward a hydrolysate whey protein formula to begin with. The alternative is one of several expensive "full" hydrolysate formulas which are just vile tasting, vile smelling, and horrendously expensive.
If baby is full-term and healthy, powdered is usually most cost effective. Many sources recommend boiling the water and utensils to sterilize for the first month--I never bothered past the first week and indeed, he had fewer problems when I stopped than before, probably because we'd changed formulas by then. <g>
If you're mixing formula from concentrate or from powder, follow the instructions *exactly*. Don't be tempted to "thin down" a formula for a chubby baby or "enrich" a formula for a skinny one. The balance of liquids, fats, nutrients and salts is critical--too much water and it stresses the baby's system in one direction. Too little and the kidneys can't handle it. The instructions are pretty straightforward. And if you get the mix right, baby can eat to hunger and generally do fine.
I found that with my foster son, a pacifier was critical because there were lots of times when he just wanted to suck, and that mean old bottle kept putting milk in him he didn't want. So I'd let him suck the pacifier, and if he spit it out but was still "mouthing", then I'd feed him.
Jenrose
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Hi -
Breastmilk is best, but clearly not an option for a single dad :-) All infant formulas are FDA regulated, so all should help your baby thrive. I'd start with a milk-based formula, and go with one that's powdered (easier to carry about and lasts longer) and see how your infant likes it. If the baby thrives on the first one you try, so much the better. The formula doesn't need to be expensive! Just one that your baby likes.
Choosing a formula is like choosing a school. Any will be acceptable, some better than others, but which is BEST really depends upon your child.
Congratulations on your new arrival! --Beth Kevles snipped-for-privacy@aol.com http://web.mit.edu/kevles/www/nomilk.html -- a page for the milk-allergic Disclaimer: Nothing in this message should be construed as medical advice. Please consult with your own medical practicioner.
NOTE: No email is read at my MIT address. Use the AOL one if you would like me to reply.
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Snip
SNIP
Congratulations Dave! (At least I think they are prolly in order.) Decisions, decisions, decisions. Sorry that I can't help much with your question, formula was a few years back and I don't recall what we did.
You might want to change the "Followup" instruction in your newsreader or google preferences or wherever they are set so the rec. doesn't feel entitled to chime in - though a baby thread is certainly no worse than all the political, corporate, medical and mailbox threads we've muddled through.
--
Owen Lowe and his Fly-by-Night Copper Company
____

"Sure we'll have fascism in America, but it'll come disguised
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Can nobody recognise forgeries?
It ain't me, folks.
I'm not a single dad, and my kids are long past formula.
--
"The thing about saying the wrong words is that A, I don't notice it, and B,
sometimes orange water gibbon bucket and plastic." -- Mr. Burrows
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OK, I take back my congrats. Guess I'm just a sucker for bambinos.
My apologies Dave. I guess I should have looked at the header info with this one. Well, at least it wasn't like the other OFFENSIVELY WORDED POSTS THAT SPAMMED THE GROUP in your name this a.m. At least with those I figured it wasn't you on a bender. ;)
--
Owen Lowe and his Fly-by-Night Copper Company
____

"Sure we'll have fascism in America, but it'll come disguised
  Click to see the full signature.
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Ask your pediatrician. S/he will have all the latest info. My ped said no lipil since it is more expensive and not proven effective for anything. It has not even been proven in the states to be safe, though it has been available in Canada for a decade. Standard stuff with iron is what my doc said. Don't flip flop brands. Pick a brand and stick to it. When you are comparing cost, compare the cost per actual fluid ounce, not powder weight as different brands require a different amount of power to yeild the same amount of liquid.
Qualifier, my baby was not newborn when I got all this advice. She was older.
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it will depend on the baby.. I would suggest seeing if you qualify for WIC then using that if it agrees with your child.. I like the Walmart brand since it is 1/2 the price of Similac.
Tori
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