Re: Bandsaw can be wired for 110 or 220



Nothing fatal/catastrophic.
110 is somewhat less efficient. More 'parasitic' losses in the wiring,
Lower voltage means more current to get the same power (HP) rating.
More current means you need bigger wiring.
If existing wiring imposes limits, you may not be able to get full power at the lower voltage.
A lot depends on the 'details' -- none of which are available. :)
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Much cussed and discussed ... no difference in cost or power consumption; theoretically longer motor life at 220v; less power loss in the wiring at 220v; motors which draw a lot of current (say 18 amps at startup on a 110 20A circuit), and frequently trip circuit breakers, will only draw 9A on the same circuit and wire at 220v.
The latter, IME, is the best reason if you have a tool that fits the profile.
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On 9/9/03 3:19 AM, in article vFb7b.360$ snipped-for-privacy@newssvr24.news.prodigy.com,

So are we in agreement that I can get the same performance (horse power) at 110? That is my only concern.
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at
Any difference won't be noticable
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If you make it "Approximately", and subject to 'external' limitations, then yes.
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Depends on what you mean. If you mean the same motor at 110/220 then probably. However, 220v motors are available that will offer more power. My understanding is that the upper limit for honest steady power at 110v is around 1-1.5hp because of the 15-20amp limit. 220 will give you more horses for the same amps.
wrote:

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wrote in

I'll take a shot and say no. Ohm's law is E=IR. E is volts, I is amps, R is resistance. The resistance is in the wire to your saw and in your saw's motor and it's constant. (Okay, technically the motor resistance depends on the load, but the resistance at a given load is the same for any voltage). Volts is either 110 or 220, no matter what method you use to achieve it. Total amps is going to be E/R, so doubling the voltage means halving the current.
Yes, you can get the same performance at 110, as long as your breaker can handle the current. All my heavy machinery-using friends tell me "If you can do it with 220, use it!", but they all have different reasons.
And watts is amps times volts, and a horsepower is about 746 watts, and once I met Red Green. He's a really nice guy.
Dan
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110
Two things come to mind. Yes, you can get the same HP, once it is running, if the distance from your panel is relatively short. The voltage drop will be greater on 110, if you are running a long way, because the wires are being loaded more to capacity than they would be on 220.
Starting current will place more load, and the motor will start slightly slower, but in most cases, that is not a big deal. I had an air compressor that I used on 220, then had to change it back to 110, and it was not happy. The motor burned out a short time later. Compressors take a lot of power to start, because they are pumping air right away. Saws do not take a lot, because you don't start cutting until the saw is up to speed.
If you are not using the equipment super heavy, and it is going to be a hassle to get 220 to it, go with the 110. Otherwise, consider this an "opportunity" to run some more power to the shop <g>.
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compressor
happy.
to
Actually a properly working compressor is NOT pumping high pressure right away. A pressure release valve should release the pbetween the pump and the tank when the compressor motor shuts off. The compressor should have no load when it starts up again.
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">

the
You have about two strokes of the pistons before the compresser has filled up the lines that the pressure release valve let out. If the motor is not up to speed by the, it is under full load. -- Jim in NC
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"Leon" wrote

Saws
to speed.

the
My compressor, like his, was unhappy on 110v - wouldn't start at all if I used an extension cord. It's happy on 220v.
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110
No, not quite. In a 110volt circuit the power flows from the hot wire to the neutral. The situation you describe would be like the 2 hots in a 220volt circuit both feeding into a neutral. This isn't how it works. The power flows from one hot back through the other hot back to the panel. Sounds weird, but it's true. It really does only draw half as many amps but the amps flow through both hots, leaving the panel in one and returning in the other, thus no neutral is needed.
Frank
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Nope, no downside as long as the 110 is sized the right amps.. "220 is better" is an old wives tale. Don't waste your time. Plug that saw in and start kicking ass on your project.
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Pretty cocky, eh? Funny, not everyone, and some pretty well informed everyones, don't share your "absolute" view. I always never make absolute statements. -- Jim in NC
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Well, I've read the entire discussion and I have yet to see a good reason for going through the trouble of converting a saw to 220 V (That was the poster's orginal question). You should use 12 guage wire for a saw outlet whether you are on 110 or 220. The extension cord for a saw is very short anyway, length of cord is not a factor.
There was a side discussion on air compressors, but all manufacturers literature that I read specifically say not to run a compressor on an extension cord (to use a longer air hose instead). If you must run a compressor on an extension cord, I'd recommend getting a 10 guage wire extension cord. But I wouldn't recommend doing it at all.
Naturally, you should also have your lights on a separate circuit from your tools if possible. That is common sense.
So, what is a legitimate reason for going through the trouble of converting a 110 V saw to 220V? There is none.
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If possible I prefer to run everything on 240 volts. Since resistive voltage drop is directly proportional to current there will be more voltage delivered to the motor when running on 240 volts. (Less voltage drop when the current drawn is 1/2 of what it is at 120 volts.)
Secondly, saturation in the motor is proportional to NI (turns x current.) If current is lower then the saturation effects are less in most motors.
It is not uncommon to see a motor rated as developing 2 HP when operated on 240 volts, but only 1.5 HP when operated on 120 volts.
Phil
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