RE: A Trip Thru Home Depot

Recently, had a couple of hours to kill before a medical appointment.
Had a couple of choices.
Sit in the medical office and try to read stale magazines which was not going to happen.
Take a trip down to the local Home Depot and see what was new and/or interesting.
Got a powered cart and drove to one end of the store and started looking around.
(Yes, these days I can have a powered cart.)
2-1/2 hours later, I was back to the starting point.
I was impressed.
New items I didn't recognize at every turn.
It was quite an eye opener.
Just a guess, but 10-20,000 items in inventory would not surprise me.
During my high school years, worked in a retail hardware store, and was pretty good at it.
Engineered a lot of solutions on Saturday morning when a prospect would enter the store in a panic with handfuls of parts and a blank stare on their face.
There is NO WAY I could provide that type of service in today's market.
To expect ONE person to be knowledgeable of the total store inventory is just not practical or more likely even possible, IMHO.
Being able to identify what part of the store a similar item might be found is about the best you can expect.
I'd be willing to bet that even an experienced tradesman might have difficulty recognizing how a part might be used if it is outside his/her sphere of expertise.
Back to the medical office with a new respect for some of the retail tasks that exist today and only a 20 minute wait for my appointment.
Lew
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On 7/15/2014 3:52 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

I can not believe you have never been inside of a HD before today.
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"Leon" wrote:

------------------------------------------------------- I've been inside HD MANY times; however, always with a specific purpose in mind and a bill of material in hand.
Never have gone "window shopping" before.
Lew
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On 7/15/2014 3:52 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

And so would a brain surgeon. ;)
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On 7/15/2014 4:52 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

Surprise, it is 40,000 Our store inventory consists of up to 40,000 different kinds of building materials, home improvement supplies, appliances and lawn and garden products for all of your project needs. Selections may vary from store to store because The Home Depot stores are always stocked with merchandise that is localized to match your area's specific market needs. We even offer a low price guarantee to beat anyone's advertised specials. And if for some reason you can't find it in the stores, we offer 250,000 other products that we can special order for you.

Sure you could had you continued. The old solutions still exist but there are some new ones now.
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On 7/15/2014 3:52 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

Ayeup ... that's where my smartphone, and Home Depot's phone app fills the bill.
Tells me much more than most aisle clerks could, from price of an unmarked item, to SKU, if it is in stock, by location and aisle/bin#, and if not in stock, the closest HD where it is. I often don't bother to get out of the truck until I know exactly where what I came for is located.
I'd say it is about 98% effective with the right information when called upon.
There are a few handy things about the 2nd decade of the 21st century. ;)
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On Tuesday, July 15, 2014 6:29:10 PM UTC-5, Swingman wrote:

I had no idea that thing actually worked. I guess I'll have to try it out. I have been finding what I need online with them, checking inventory, the n calling the store as my pattern of buying from them.
I hate to go for supplies or materials. I can't stand it, and it doesn't m atter what it is for or whom I am buying from. It always seems to take too long and is an inconvenient, and worse, sometimes just downright annoying. I will have to look into that app. I didn't know it existed, and surprise d to hear it works so well!
Robert
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On 7/16/2014 12:19 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Use HD Pro, but I also have the consumer version. The Pro allows you to setup Lists with a project name and keep track of items you need and/or purchased for a particular job/project, plus keeps track of your purchase e-receipts.
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

"Ed Pawlowski" wrote:

<snip> ---------------------------------------------------------- All that and still couldn't find #10 AWG, molded cord sets of 15 ft min length.
How am I supposed to rewire a table saw?
Lew
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On Tue, 15 Jul 2014 17:09:02 -0700, "Lew Hodgett"

Not surprising.

Make it yourself. SJ plus the appropriate connector and five minutes work.
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Well, I've been a contractor for more than a few weeks now, and I have more than a few old extension cords in various states hanging on hooks in the shop. Some of them are 10 gage for heavy tools in the field. They make dandy repair cords for stuff. In fact I never throw away a tool without salvaging brushes, switches, and of course the power cord.

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Not likely to find molded in that length. For an oven or dryer in shorter lengths, yes. For both my cabinet saws and band saw I had to make up my own. Because all of my stationary equipment is on mobile bases I actually made a 30' extension cord and put 4-5 footers on the machines. The TS, BS, and planer use that 10-3 extension cord.
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Count your blessings. I use a cart too and by the time I find what I want - usually less than 1/2 hour - the battery is so low that I'm lucky to make it to the door :)
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ONE person does not know the entire store and the inventory of every depart ment in the store. That is why there are different people in every departm ent and they stay only in that department and help only people in that depa rtment. When you go to any of the big hardware stores they have personnel in each department and they have knowledge of that area and trade. People who know plumbing in the plumbing department, people who know electrical in the electrical department, people who know paint in the paint department, people who know kitchen cabinets in the kitchen cabinet area, etc.
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+1 I use the same strategy. I have a couple different lengths of heavy 220 drop cords, so I can use more than one machine out from its normal place at one time.
--
Jim in NC


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Lew Hodgett wrote:

"Leon" wrote:

Negatory good buddy, molded cord sets are made in 15, 25, 50, 75 and 100 ft lengths and wire sizes #10 AWG, #12 AWG, #14 AWG and #16 AWG.
#18 AWG is beyond the scope since it is really "zip" cord.
The terminations are another matter.
If money is no object, you buy SJO cord by the foot and add the required termination.
Expensive, but it gets the job done.
OTOH, buying a molded cord set of the required wire gauge and length, then cutting off the female termination and wiring it directly into the motor, will save you a bunch of money.
If the male plug on the cord set can be used, so much the better.
If not, you only have one end to replace.
If I were to set up a shop today, as many tools as possible would be 240V/1PH/60 HZ and 10-4 locking device plug and receptacles would be used. (L1-N-L2-G).
Having 120VAC available on the tool can prove to be quite useful.
As far as your shop is concerned, having your T/S or other tool wired with a 15-25 ft cord would provide even greater flexibility than you now have.
Lew
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On Wed, 16 Jul 2014 18:14:40 -0700, "Lew Hodgett"

with twist-lock connectors. That way storing the cords and storing tthe machines without cords is simpler and neater than storing machines with long attached cords.
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But not for a specific hook up, male on one end and nothing on the other, as you implied by your specific need.

Hense my suggestion.

And if that fits the requirement or is all that is available.

Perhaps but I would have to deal with 90' of total 10-3 cord. Now I only have one 30' piece and at a greater cost savings. That has been working well for 15 years with no wish for nothing better.

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Precisely
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