Re: A couple of newbie questions.....

On 30 Mar 2004 19:42:47 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (Scott Vajdos) wrote:

World's ugliest book list: http://codesmiths.com/shed/books/woodworking.htm
Get the first Tage Frid, the Flexner, Kirby or Duginske when you get that machine tool. Hoadley when you get serious.
For project books, think about what style you like. Bavaro & Mossman for Stickley, maybe Becksvoort for Shaker (lovely book, not really project-based)
Who does a good _project_ book on Shaker ?

Particle board (chipboard to the Brits) is rubbish. MDF is useful. Don't be ashamed to use MDF, especially if you need to furnish a house and do it quickly.
Working MDF needs a cheap handheld circular saw with a fine blade (don't stick with the supplied multi-use one) and a cheap biscuit jointer. With those two, you can built furniture.
You _must_ have breathing protection. Eyes and ears too. For MDF, I prefer a full face mask on my respirator instead of glasses, because the stuff floats on the air and gets into my eyes.
For curves, get a jigsaw. Round-body Bosch are the best - a good jigsaw _does_ make a difference over a cheap one.
When you can (cash and space) get a 10" table saw that's vaguely usable. I think Ryobi 3000 is the "starter level" US model that's worth having - Axminster BTS10PP in the UK.

Biscuit jointed MDF. Lovely stuff, quick to work.
Surface is ugly (looks like cardboard) so either paint or veneer it. If painting, start with proper MDF primer, or fibres raise on the surface.
--
Smert' spamionam

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On Thu, 01 Apr 2004 02:03:12 +0100, Andy Dingley

Maybe A. Dingley?
Barry
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On Thu, 01 Apr 2004 03:20:13 GMT, B a r r y

What ? Me, write a book ? That'll be the day.... I'm still weeks behind on a couple of piddling little magazine articles.
If I did write something, it would probably be a monograph on the historical development of spirit and oil varnishes. I've already done much of the research (along with my tame but only semi house-trained chemist).
Is there a good history of Barnsley and Gimson around ? They're closer to my doorstep than the Shakers.
--
Smert' spamionam

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Dandelion77 wrote:

If you throw it out in the lawn, it will dissolve and you can compost it. :)
--
Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
Linux fanatic, and certified Geek; registered Linux user #243621
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Actually I agree with you BUT thinking back to when I just got of college (1965) and set up my first home (shop in the basement) Dust was something that was just an accepted part of woodworking... Dust collection was (I believe) unheard of in the home shop)
HOWEVER I have to assume that the OP is like I was at that point of my life (unless he got a large sign on bonus from a corporation) and his first priority will be buying tools to create sawdust rather then to eliminate sawdust from the air...
I would tell him forgo the DC and the air filters and use a shop vac for a little while until he knows what he is dealing with... If he is anything like me just fitting "Common No 2 Pine" into the budget was difficult
I can not comment on any woodworking books...mainly because I just never read any ( or if I did they sure did not impress me ) .. only books that I ever purchased were for finishing, since I think that is an art..

Not a thing wrong with any of those... I have been a subscriber of Wood smith since issue number one and have all my old copies...never without an idea for the NEXT project

BEST YOU CAN AFFORD.... !! well said !
I would also include the dreaded Crapsman (pre 1965 mod...and one with a real motor that is belt driven... BUT used contractors saws are pretty hard to find (at least I do not see them in the newspaper much) BUT the Table Saw is perhaps the ONLY tool I would really tell the guy to BLOW the budget and even use "plastic" on...
Bob Griffiths...
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Finishing gets easier with time and attempts. I made the mistake of using too many different finishes instead of using just one and really getting used to its' capabilities. The morning starts reading 3 finishing forums and looking at responses from gurus to enhance understanding of finishing. Jeff Jewitt at www.homesteadfinishing.com and Russ Ramirez at www.woodfinishingsupplies.com and Jeff Weiss at www.targetcoatings.com for waterbased stuff. I read MANY descriptions of French Polishing but little stuck. Got the video from Jeff Jewitt which included French Polishing and it REALLY helped. I'm even rubbing out the WB lacquer I'm spraying and wife is happier. Hardest part may be the waiting period between steps.
On Thu, 01 Apr 2004 08:52:01 -0500, Bob G.

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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (Scott Vajdos) wrote in message

Since you got the general view about tablesaws and particle board/mdf, I'll just ditto someone and say Tage Frid Teaches Woodworking, Volumes I & II is the best set of books you can buy, I've been doing this for a while and refer to them all the time. They sell a softcover with both volumes in one book now, go to a Barnes & Noble store and preview, then amazon to buy it, you'll never regret it. Mutt
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