Ratcheting screwdriver, ever break or wear out one?

I'm talking about a typical ratcheting screwdriver like one that has a hex bit holder on the end. I've done some research/shopping, I've seen many different brands. Talking about the ratcheting screwdrivers priced from $8-$30.
How much force can be applied when turning it in the working direction, without doing any damage whatsoever?
How long would it last if it were spun in the reverse direction? The direction that makes it click.
Is there going to be much difference between $8 and $30 models in those respects?
I intend to put them to the test. So I'm just wondering if it's in the ballpark to think that they can take all the force most of our hands put on them when using them to drive nuts or screws. And also that turning them in the reverse direction so they spin/click freely does no harm no matter how long you were to do that.
Thanks.
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John Doe wrote:

I would just buy a Craftsman, if available for your needs, and be done with it. If you go cheaper than that, then you will probably live to regret your purchase! : )

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email.me:

I've seen a few break. On the ones I have, it's usually a band clamp that's holding a ball bearing on the bit holder that comes off first. After that the tool becomes annoying to use and for my purposes, useless.
Sometimes ratcheting tools won't catch, or the ratcheting mechanism only turns back a little bit. Running such a tool backwards excessively is a good way to see the first failure mode.
As for your price range, there's no guarantee of better quality at the $30 end of the scale vs the $8 end. You're well within the range of "other considerations" driving up price. Sometimes it's the brand name, the store selling the tool, or even just the color. There's likely to be a quality difference, but it's not certain.
Puckdropper
--
Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

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On Thu, 3 Jul 2014 05:39:50 +0000 (UTC), John Doe

Here's a couple examples ..
http://www.leevalley.com/US/wood/page.aspx?pp285&cat=1,43411,70372
http://www.leevalley.com/US/wood/page.aspx?pp725&cat=1,43411,43417&ap=1
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On Thu, 3 Jul 2014 05:39:50 +0000 (UTC), John Doe

I've still got a 35+ rear old (wood handled) one around thet generally works pretty good when you get the little slider in the right position, and I've pitchead a good half dozen cheap Chinese plastic handled ones that have stripped, jammed, and failed in just about any way you could imagine. A good one will take all the torque your wrist will give it, or more than a #10 screw will stand. A cheap one will just bust your knuckles.
Good and cheap don't necessarily have any relation to cost, athough good ones are seldom "cheap" and cheap ones are seldom "good"
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On Thu, 03 Jul 2014 11:41:43 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@ccanoemail.com wrote:

Anything Lee Valley carries will be, at the very least, decent. The Wera is a good screwdriver but I suspect slightly overpriced, being a German import. The Rollgear should be good value for the money. The Wera is a 44 tooth ratchet, the Rollgear is a roller sprague
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On Thu, 03 Jul 2014 18:25:39 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Off topic ... here's one that's a little different - - a Wera ratchet - that's also a hammer !
http://www.wera.de/catalog_de.html?L=1&file=/en/root_category_ratchets_koloss.html
When the Wera rep first mentioned it - I thought he was joking ! Nope. John T.
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On Thu, 03 Jul 2014 21:19:31 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@ccanoemail.com wrote:

Good for knocking out sticky bolts.
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I've a snap-on ratchet screwdriver. Magnetic holder takes hex bits. Still going strong after about 30 years and it is well used. You get what you pay for. Reminds me of a little tale from the '70's. Snap-On has lifetime guarantee. The rep used to call on us a couple of times a month. An aged mechanic here thought he's have a game with the rep. He had two 1" drive socket wrenches. Both pre WWII and both broken (stripped gears). He presented these to the snap-on rep and asked what could be done. Rep said 'leave them with me for a couple of weeks'. On return the mechanic was given two brand new replacements. I understand one of the old wrenches is now on display in a museum. As I say, you get what you pay for. Nick.
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There are tools that aren't also hammers?
[Though I usually just use a scrap chunk of wood for banging on chisels.]
--
Grant

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