RAS Too Tight

I have pulled the old Craftsman out of hiding and building it a new table.
As part of the process, I tried elevating the blade with the existing crank and found it most difficult to take it through the range. I am thinking of adding a longer/larger handle to increase my leverage. ut thought to ask here if anyone had any suggestions based upon personal experience with this issue and might offer a serious resolution thereto.
Also, has anyone had any success finding part descriptions or manuals for older Sears RAS on the net?
Thanks in advance.
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On Mon, 2 Jun 2008 08:12:13 -0700 (PDT), Hoosierpopi

I wouldn't try a longer, "cheater bar" handle. That just, ahem, elevates the risk of overtorquing some invisible, yet vital part. I've squirted penetrating oil (or, quelle horror, WD-40) around the junction between the column and the column insert (or column and column sleeve, depending on how you look at it) and letting it sit for a while. Then try running it up and down. You might need a few applications, depending on how long and under what conditions it's been sitting around.

Try the old standby, http://www.owwm.com and just like Sears table saws, the RASes have much in common with predecessors and successors over the years (particularly so long as you stick with an Emerson built model, man # 113), so if you don't get an exact manual, you should at least find some useful part names (see "column" above) and their relationships with one another.
--
LRod

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wrote:

Every 10 years or so, I find I have to clean out sawdust that builds up in crevices of the column. It can pack in quite tight and prevent movement in the extreme positions.
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wrote:

I wonder if you have a two piece column sleeve. Mine is a single cast iron piece. They changed that in the mid '70s (mine is a 1972).
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LRod

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If the "sleeve" is the piece at the base into which the column descends and from which it rises, I recall it appeared to be a single casting. - w/o looking at it again before posting this reply ;) I need to collect the model numb er and look it up at Sear Parts to see what I can find there - save all significant parts are "unavailable!"

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Thank you all. I appreciate all teh tips and liked that sock idea! My column is relatively clean - saved where it was exposed (I had it cranked way down for shipping, but it left two inches or so "exposed") abnd that area shows some corrosion. Nothing steel wool & elbow grease won't cure.
I had already soaked the column in penetrating oil and let it sit, soaked again (after raising and lowering) and soaked it again. I was getting ready to dismantle the thing and doo some serious cleansing but thought to ask first lest I get myself in deeper than I should for less benefit than hoped for. I learned my lessons years ago, before you start a new venture, seek expert advice - on an old Toyota, the sequence of removing the old calipers/brake pads can mean the difference between a hour per side and 10 minutes or so - learned after spending an hour on the driver's side and - after friend and pro mechanic Roscoe tipped me off - tem inutes doing the other side.
Thanks again.
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I get a "This domain name is for sale" message.
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Try www.owwm.com
Dave
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Hoosierpopi wrote:

Agree w/ the soak advice and no cheaters. Depending on the model, there may be an adjusting sleeve around the column which can be let off some while you're playing. Be sure to work some penetrating oil/kerosene/etc. into the gearing as well. Is it direct drive or belt driven (so the crank is at the front)? Be sure the shaft(s) don't bind as well.
If there's any rust/dirt/etc. on the column, use fine emery/steel wool/etc. to shine it up as well.
As for parts/manuals/etc., at least try the Sears site w/ your model number--there's quite a lot of info on much even if not all.
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wrote:

NO NO NO!! You stand a great chance of damaging the saw..
Take anything you can apart and clean and lubricate it, then see how all adjustments work out...
Over stressing any part, but especially an old part, with more force than intended is the fast lane for buying expensive replacement parts for an old saw.. DAMHIKT
If you have a rusty bolt, you soak it and try later, not put a pipe on the wrench and force it, right?
mac
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In article <5443e8ad-c6b4-46b4-9b87-14568b91b461

Likely culprits: Dried out grease, dried out grease mixed with sawdust and set like concrete, rust.
What they said: use penetrating oil, kerosene, or the stuff that mechanics use to clean engine blocks to try and clear the obstructions. Especially what you said about taking it through the full range being difficult makes me think 'foreign matter in the column'.
-P.
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Peter Huebner wrote:

Bingo. This would be the first thing I would check. On many a RAS, the crank drives a gear in a small box that elevates the column rack. This frequently gets packed with crud and sawdust.

Instead of oiling the column, I'd take whatever appropriately fine grade of abrasive pad or sandpaper and remove any rust and debris that have bonded to it. If your column isn't clean, it will bind. Try to access the base collar for the column, look there for accumulations.
Should things still move with resistance after cleaning, perhaps the lightest coat of Teflon spray lube would be something to consider.
Regards,
Edward Hennessey
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I have a Sears RAS that I bought in 1975 that I use all the time. It gets a little stiff to raise sometimes. When that happens take the back panel of the table off and below that you will see the shaft that you are turned to lift the saw. Where it connects up with the column that raises up there is a little metal box. On the top or the front of the box is a little hole. A few drops of machine oil in that hole will do wonders for making it raise easier.
All the information that you got concerning cleaning and lubricating the column is good advise also. I made a sleeve out of an old sock to fit around the column where is slides into the frame to help keep that area clean.
Regards,
Al
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