Rare earth magnetic knife holders

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I want to take a strip of oak and rout holes in it for quarter sized rare earth magnets to stick my knives to rather than having them in a drawer, which I think is unsafe.
What is a good glue to use to hold these magnets in there? If they fall out, no biggie to re-glue.
But I'm a do it once kind of guy.
Steve
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I have a lot of money tied up in my kitchen knives. Contact with some metals can also lead to an electrolytic reaction that will cause rusting and staining of the blade.
Personally, I wouldn't ever damage the blade surface by hanging them or dragging them across a magnet. That's just me... Would it be a good thing to make a custom knife block?
Hey... where's Lew?
Epoxy, damnit! :^)
Robert
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Hey... where's Lew?
Epoxy, damnit! :^) ------------------------------ I here master, I here.
Depending on magnet size, drill a blind hole with a brad point drill 5/8" dia and below or a forstner bit above 5'8" dia so that magnet is flush.
Rough up back side of magnet with a coarse grinding wheel.
Mix up some slow laminating epoxy thickened with microballoons to the consistency of mayo.
Butter hole with epoxy and set rough surface of magnet in hole and wait 24 hours before trimming excess "green cured" epoxy away.
Blue painter's tape is your friend.
Lew
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Geez Lew! All that time and effort to mount a magnet, makes me wonder how long does it take when you have a "big" project to build?
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Then he uses macroballoons.
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"Lew Hodgett" wrote in message

Which brings up the point that some rare-earth magnets are made of materials (cobalt, neodymium) considered fairly toxic. If memory serves the REM I got from Lee Valley had instructions telling me to wash my hands after handling the magnets. So perhaps the grinding wheel thing should be reconsidered. Lee Valley also says their steel magnet mounting cups increase the effectiveness of their magnets by four times.
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wrote:

I have a lot of money tied up in my kitchen knives. Contact with some metals can also lead to an electrolytic reaction that will cause rusting and staining of the blade.
Personally, I wouldn't ever damage the blade surface by hanging them or dragging them across a magnet. That's just me... Would it be a good thing to make a custom knife block?
Hey... where's Lew?
Epoxy, damnit! :^)
How about a thin coat of epoxy on face of magnet?? ww
Robert
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wrote:

I have a lot of money tied up in my kitchen knives. Contact with some metals can also lead to an electrolytic reaction that will cause rusting and staining of the blade.
Personally, I wouldn't ever damage the blade surface by hanging them or dragging them across a magnet. That's just me... Would it be a good thing to make a custom knife block?
Hey... where's Lew?
Epoxy, damnit! :^)
Robert
Various analyses have shown what common-sense reflection has no trouble endorsing: storing knives in slotted blocks (especially wood) can put them in a great bacterial reservoir. Of course, if you scrupulously dry, chemically disinfect or autoclave your knives and maintain a block in germicidal condition, you're all good.
Aside, when Carl Linnaeus first grouped bacteria and viruses, he put them under the taxonomic heading "Chaos".
Regards,
EH
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wrote:

Hmmmm.... not likely to throw out my wooden knife block of 30 years. I don't own an autoclave. I don't chemically disinfect. I wash my knives after each use, dry them, and put them in the block.
Perhaps you should enhance your cleaning protocols. I have never seen, smelled, or witnessed in any fashion bacterial growth in my wooden knife block.
With millions in use around the world, I wonder why this so apparent to you hasn't been an issue of "common sense"...
At any rate, to help you understand, this is a comparison of plastic to wood for cutting board usage. I was able to determine that if bacterial debris was able to be well managed on a wood cutting board that has direct contact with raw meat, raw vegetables, etc., then "common sense" tells me I am probably fine.
The knife block has a tremendous advantage over the cutting board which sees more potentially dangerous use. The knife block receives dry, clean knifes into a dry, clean slot. The cutting board deals with all manner of raw foods at all different temperatures, and then has them pushed down into slits cut into the surface from normal use.
Yet, according to UC Davis, the bacteria farming surface of a cutting board can be easily managed.
http://faculty.vetmed.ucdavis.edu/faculty/docliver/Research/cuttingboard.htm
Other research has verified this study. And the wood vs. anything else issue for all manner of kitchen ware has been beaten to death. DAGS is a great ally when understanding this issue.
After re-reading that study, I am betting that my dry, clean knife block has an even better chance at a maintaining a clean, safe surface, much more so than the wood cutting boards.
Maybe it's just me and a few million others....
Robert
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The other alternative is to have a healthy immune system.
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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CnmMNdiCz_s

RIP George.
R
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wrote in message


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CnmMNdiCz_s

RIP George.
R
You beat me to it. Carlin was, I believe, one of the greats.
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"CW" wrote in message

One of these days I'm going to spring for that complete box-set of all his HBO specials and other TV appearances.
I especially like his 11th Commandment--Thou shall keep they religion to thyself.
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Thank you -- my wife just came in to find out what was making me laugh!
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?Why not route the holes on the back side of the oak strip, but only going part-way through. That'd leave an umblemished oak face. Another similar suggestion would be to inlay a different colored wood "spot" centered on each magnet. The magnet would be inlayed from the back and the spot from the front, leaving only wood showing.
Karl
"Edward Hennessey" wrote in message wrote:

I have a lot of money tied up in my kitchen knives. Contact with some metals can also lead to an electrolytic reaction that will cause rusting and staining of the blade.
Personally, I wouldn't ever damage the blade surface by hanging them or dragging them across a magnet. That's just me... Would it be a good thing to make a custom knife block?
Hey... where's Lew?
Epoxy, damnit! :^)
Robert
Various analyses have shown what common-sense reflection has no trouble endorsing: storing knives in slotted blocks (especially wood) can put them in a great bacterial reservoir. Of course, if you scrupulously dry, chemically disinfect or autoclave your knives and maintain a block in germicidal condition, you're all good.
Aside, when Carl Linnaeus first grouped bacteria and viruses, he put them under the taxonomic heading "Chaos".
Regards,
EH
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On 2010-10-29 03:54:45 -0400, " snipped-for-privacy@aol.com"

Maybe drill the hole from the backside, so the expoxied magnet is behind the surface the knife touches? Or drill the hole from the front and veneer over the entire piece. Might want to use some of those famous "sketchy" knives while testing for depth and thickness vs. magnet strength.
And after you're finished, get rid of the junk knives -- those things are MORE dangerous than good knives.
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Don't glue, screw. http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?pX750&cat=1,42363,42348
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Thank you! I was wading through all the replies to see if I needed to post a link to these.. I use them for my lathe tools and they focus the magnetic force where you need it..
mac
Please remove splinters before emailing
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com says...

One option: <http://www.leevalley.com/US/wood/page.aspx?p2066&cat1,42363,42348>
Another option--it's not as pretty as oak but it's 7 bucks: <http://www.harborfreight.com/18-inch-magnetic-holder-65489.html>.
A third option: Make a drawer liner with slots for the knives.
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Steve,
I haven't seen anyone else mention this so either I'm the first or I'm stoopid... But won't the blade pick up magnetism eventually? That's not such a good thing to me but may be a useless or harmless trait otherwise.
I just envision sharpening the blade and knowing that there are small pieces of shaved-off steel all over the magnetic blade ready to jump into my food.
--


Regards,
Joe Agro, Jr.
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