Random Orbit Polisher

Can I use my Porter Cable 333 RO sander with a wool pad as a polisher for wood?
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Why not try it?
--

-Mike-
snipped-for-privacy@alltel.net
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Yes
http://www.woodcraft.com/family.aspx?familyid693
--
Bill B.

http://home.comcast.net/~bberg100
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On Feb 6, 12:02 am, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Polisher or buffer? There are goodies that work on sanders that could be used on them that could do a version of either, but as MM says later, you would have to try it.
I DID try this with one of my Bosch VS sanders, and it wasn't satisfactory in any way. The tiny little circles your sander makes doesn't give you the long stroke a polisher needs, nor does it make use of a good quality lambs wool bonnet for polishing.
The reason is that the fibers in the polishing/buffing head compress, and absorb the movement needed to polish or buff. In fact, try mounting a nice lw bonnet (1" fibers) on your sander and set it down while running. It will sit there humming away, with no polishing action going on at all.
Now imagine that head with some polishing compound on it. Instead of passing by in wide revolutions with a large swirling motion, you will be winding up the fibers in the compound in with tiny little 1/8" swirls at 12,000 rpms.
When I did this, I had no luck at all, but YMMV. I was lucky enough to have someone give me the polishing head and buffing bonnet at a trade show as a gimme. The product was fine, but for me just didn't work.
Although you can get some small benefit out of the heads meant to fit your sander if you have a larger or variable radius orbit, the end result will probably be disappointing. To me, you might be better off to buy a cheap polisher.
Robert
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wrote:

I'm kind of a polishing buff. Some of the new Staron Tempest colours require some serious 'glossification' if I want the depth of the clear particles to look like glass. Solid surface now looks like quartz. A very fine look indeed. I always put high gloss on Corian's darker colours...and I mean high gloss. Real pretty, not practical.
But, even though my Rotex sanders claim to have polishing abilities, a dedicated polisher is far superior, even a cheapo Chaiwanese one (with variable speed here at Princess Auto, much like Harbor Freight.....like 70 dollars). The trick is a proper adaptor and buffing pad. I bought a McGuire kit, handed back some of the bottles of polishing compounds for a credit, but that is one great pad. Lambs wool, double sided. The trick, at least for my materials, is the slow speed. Less than 1000 rpm.
I also polished MinWax acrylic lacquer (4 coats) I sprayed on cherry. I let it dry for a week and put a shine on it like glass. (Personally. I prefer a more subdued sheen, like a French polish, but customers are always right.)
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wrote:

Wow.. tough way to make a living... Does the polishing compound come off in the shower?
mac
Please remove splinters before emailing
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you seem to be the only one awake here....
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*Snippage*

What did you use for compounds?
Following your lead, a cheap polisher is better than a sander. I use this one and it sure fits the budget:
http://tinyurl.com/e2b8s
Variable speed, comfortable to use, and just runs and runs. Note the cost of the microfiber pad at the bottom.
I am using a polishing rouge from the specialty auto store now along with a pad you could wear as a sweater for final polish. I have another pad that is still wool, but harder with 3/4" wool on it to cut down the finish in the initial polishing.
The compounds are grey to smooth, and pink to polish. It has their house label on it, and they swear it is their special blend for car lacquer polishing (*cough*bullshit*cough*)
But it works, so I buy it.
Robert
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wrote:

Dry Finesse-it sticks. Last page on this .pdf: http://www.avonitesurfaces.com/pdf/july07_FabGuide/sec2b.pdf

That looks so similar to mine that I'm sure it came from the same OEM shop.
I used to have a Makita but it went along with the business when I sold it. I wasn't in the mood to buy it again, so I figured what the hell, I'll try a cheapo. Works great!

The pads I use are 3M. You need an adaptor to go from the threads on the polisher to the threads on the pad. It also extends the post a bit to make room for that thick pad. I use a different pad for the three polishing modes.... and one clean.

There is a difference between 'cut' and 'polish'.... but all polishing has some cutting taking place.
r
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RE: Polishing Compound
SFWIW, 3M brand, pink in color, sold by the gallon at auto finish supply ditributors, does a great job on gel coat on boats that have faded due to the sun.
Lew
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Betcha money that's it. The probably buy it in a 55 gallon drum (these guys are huge) and repackage. I buy it in a bottle that looks like a Titebond bottle with a little red tip on it and an obviously laser-printed label on it.
Hmm....
Is your 3M stuff water or solvent based?
Robert
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Betcha money that's it. The probably buy it in a 55 gallon drum (these guys are huge) and repackage. I buy it in a bottle that looks like a Titebond bottle with a little red tip on it and an obviously laser-printed label on it.
Hmm....
Is your 3M stuff water or solvent based?
Can't remember, haven't used the stuff in years.
Had a half gallon that got frozen over the winter.
Had to deep six it.
Stop at any auto finish supplier and take a look.
Make it worth the trip and get some 1000-2000 grit paper for your scary sharp system<grin>
At there price you can buy a gallon, use a quart, throw they rest away and still be ahead of the game.
Lew
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That's the 3M polishing compound. It's been around for a good many years. It requires a power tool to apply and bring it up, but it is the liquid to use on fiberglass gelcoat.
It is very fine "cut" but as you already know, 3M also has many other similar products.
I have done my boat using the 3M polishing and then finished it off with 3M "Finesse-it" which is an even finer "cut".
It's water based as far as I know.
snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

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I would be surprised if it DIDN'T. I can't even get mine to do bad job, the damn think has roller bearings in it so it doesn't even rattle when it is on low speeds.
Are you listening Porter Cable?
Sorry... I digress.

Yeah, but I didn't want to get into all of that. To get that perfect finsh you cannot start with a polisher/buffer, anyway. I just didn't want to get into the whole "properly" rubbed finish conversation.
It's late.
Robert
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On Feb 6, 1:02 am, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

What type finish?
Have used an ROS with gray Scotchbrite to rub varnish and oil based enamel paint between coats. Works great, fast enough to burn off the finish if you're not careful.
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