Ran out of clamps... (w/pics)

I spent the day rough cutting, planing, jointing and gluing up the hard maple panels that I need for the drawers in my parents kitchen.
http://www.federatedtool.com/david/img/mejointing.jpg
After the 12th glue up, I started to run out of clamps, I even reached for the 60" and 80" pair then finally ran out of clamps on the 14th panel.
http://www.federatedtool.com/david/img/14panels.jpg
Tomorrow is another day...
David.
Every neighbourhood has one, in mine, I'm him.
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You know Dave, you coulda doubled up on the boards being glued up by a set of clamps.

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Leon,

I would have ganged them, but the boards are under 11/16" and narrow in some cases. I was using up cut offs and other material culled from being on the outside (mineral stains, worm holes, etc.)of the cabinets. These are for drawer sides so gluing up a 1.5", 3" and 1.5" board to make a 6" board didn't bother me. I didn't want any bowing, and plus, I have never run out of clamps before.
David.
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Do you plan on painting the drawer sides to hide the glue lines and stains or is it really not going to matter at all?
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meep! meep!

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Looks like a lot of work, but I know you can handle it. Nice pictures too. Joe
David F. Eisan wrote:

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David F. Eisan wrote:

    j4
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I'm disappointed. There is no assistant in these pics.
-- Bill Pounds http://www.billpounds.com/woodshop

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David (David David) F. Eisan wrote:

Now see here I thought you'd gotten rid of that piece of sh*t Chiwanese jointer and traded up to a machine more befitting your station in life? What? No prisons going out of bidness this week?

I'll let you in on a little secret I've been hording here all by myself. I stumbled upon it whilst contemplating the gluing of the laminate on the Queen Size Out Feed Table (QSOFT) for El Guapo. You might want to enable the Print function on your toaster there as I think I'm 'bout to get wordy.
Shop Snippets (tmMe):
There I was faced with gluing down the laminate for a QSOFT. At the time my primary concern was open time (tyme David) for the glue. I worked it through my head that I had a good half an hour of time (tyme David) before I would have to cinch up the sphincter muscles and start worrying. Then it hit me. "All I Needed Was A Half An Hour" (AINWAHAH). I mean, if you can't spread 35ish sq. ft. of glue, slap down some P-lam and weight it all down in a half an hour you're probably not suited for the simple task of WoodDorking. As it turned out I had the time (tyme David) to do this between the time (OK, I'll quit now) I got home from work and when supper (dinner David) was on the table. Wow! That meant I could have both sides laminated before I went to bed. Wow!
Now, let's stop a minute and examine one of the conundrums of working in the shop (shoppe David). What happens, usually, if there you are with a full Saturday ahead of you and what do you go and do, you do something stoopid like glue something up in the morning (Ante Meridian David) which means you're stuck waiting on glue to dry. Right? In other words, you can't go on so you're off wasting time (tyme David/sorry, I couldn't resist) waiting for glue to dry. Where do you end up? In front of the computer looking at rec.wood.
Need I go on? I didn't think so.
But, with the proper allocation of Shop Snippets (tmMe) you can increase your through flow/output and bring your wooddorking skills to new heights the like of which you'd never dreamed. No really, it's true. May I?
So where is this going and what does it have to do with you? I'll es'plain. There I am a few weeks later and I have a small pile of alder that's taking up room so I decide to glue it up into panels for future projects (pro-jects David). I'm limited to enough clamps to glue up five panels at a time. After milling the edges one Sunday I quit a wee bit before evening and settled down for an evening of what ever was on TV. The next day I arrive home from work and I have a half an hour. What to do? I glued up five panels. After supper (dinner David) I glued up five more. Before going to bed, I glued up five more. Simple math now kicks in and I have five times three and that equals fifteen and it's not even Tuesday yet. Extrapolating this out for the next four days and I could have seventy five panels by Friday night.
Now, when was the last time you had a stack of seventy five panels waiting for you on Saturday morning ready to go? More specifically, when was the last time you could work with seventy five panels during a good weekend and run out of work by the time it came time to slack off on Sunday night and sit down and watch TV?
See where this is going?
Now, that's just glue ups. Stop and think for a minute. How many wooddorking processes (pro-cesses David) require more than a good half an hour? Not many. Using Shop Snippets (tmMe) here and there you can/will find yourself done with most projects before you ever knew it. Come home from work, set up and work out milling some part/piece. Stop for supper. Go back out to the shop and mill the parts/pieces. After that, set up for the next part. Go to bed. The next day, come back and mill those parts. Stop for supper. Rinse and repeat. The next thing you know you're thumbing the pages of this month's Wooddorking For Wimmen looking for the next thing you're wanting to make.
Shop Snippets (tmMe), use them, they are your friend.
UA100
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On Sat, 16 Oct 2004 19:20:55 -0400, "David F. Eisan"

Question regarding your technique. It looks like you are applying downward pressure on the infeed side of the jointer?
...snip
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Regarding this whole pressure on jointer question...
One of the best things I ever read on the web was "Let the jointer do the work". I don't apply any pressure anywhere, the wood is heavy enough to hold itself down on the bed of the jointer, all I am doing is feeding the board. Any significant pressure applied by me would flex the board and it would flex back after I released the pressure. I want a *flat* board. Again, just feed the board, let the jointer do the work.
With my jointer I have to use a fair amount of force to push a board through. Taking a 3/16" cut on a 9" hard maple board with a 3HP jointer exerts *a lot* of force back towards me. What you don't see in the photograph is my Dad on the outfeed side pulling the board clear and letting the guard swing back once I have pushed the board slightly past the cutterhead.
The big pork chop guard did bother me when I first got the jointer but I got used to it fast. I expect for someone shorter or of generous girth, it might be more of a problem.
David.
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On Sun, 17 Oct 2004 23:55:37 -0400, "David F. Eisan"

What puzzled me was the distance the board was over the outfeed table with your push pad still on the infeed side. Thought process was that once the board is sufficiently clear on the outfeed side, you want to push down on that side, since, theoretically, that side is now flat to the table and you shouldn't be flexing the board at all.

Yes

I would guess. 3/16? Wow. I'm surprised you don't have significant tear-out problems.

Ah, that explains how you could maintain pressure on the infeed side without having the board not remain flat on the outfeed side.

It all probably comes down to what works best for anyone -- you know your machine and what works for you. I suspect for every job and every woodworker, there are an equal number of ways to do things.
Thanks for the answer, you did clear up the question.
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