Raised Panel Router Bits

Wondering which type of raised panel router bit, vertical or horizontal is inherently safer. I have the router table, and 3-1/4 hp variable speed router to handle either. I would think that placing the panel horizontally, flat on the table and feeding it into the bit would be preferred, but I think that I would have to add a collet extension to be able to raise the bit high enough. Does spinning a 2-1/2" to 3-1/2" bit on a collet extension create a problem? I don't have a whole lot in the router, Woodcraft and Freud were dumping a 3-1/4 hp last year for $125 or so, it's worked well under the table so far, I guess I could give the extension a shot and see what happens. Are featherboards and an extended fence enough to make a vertical approach safe and reliable? Thanks, it's always a pleasure to tap the experience out there.
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With the wood properly supported and with a high enough fence, most would agree that a vertical raised panel but is safer.
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the table rather than having to push it against a fence (by whatever means). I've gotten better *results* with horizontal bits.
If safety is the main concern, go vertical.
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Quality of cut is not something I've considered. So far, I've only used a horizontal panel bit. Have you tried both types? With a horizontal bit, the panel being cut should be fed through repeatedly until proper depth of cut is achieved. I wonder about doing something similar with a vertical bit to get a better result?
If you've tried both types of bits, can I assume you've used a featherboard with the vertical bit?
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One of the things that I do like about the vertical bits is that chip collection is a lot easier. The drawback, is that the speed of the cutter, at the tip, relative to the wood being cut, is a bit slow. The increase in safety by using a vertical bit, is undeniable.
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wrote in message

to get rid of all traces of "wiggle" when standing a panel on edge, regardless of the height of the fence. And, yes, I used featherboards for both operations.
Joe
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"joe" wrote:

I'm with Joe; however, even with a featherboard(s) being used as hold downs, it is important to make sure the panel is FULLY supported by the table or runout roller support.
Lew
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I'm surprised no one has mentioned yet the possibility of using the smaller "vertical" bit horizontally. FWW had plans for a horizontal router table as well as for a "versatile" router table used conventionally, vertically, or overhead, and there are a few others floating around the net. Seems to give the safety and better dust collection of the smaller bit, with the solidity of horizontally held workpiece. Can't do anything for slower tip speed, if you think that is an issue.
No experience here; just have seen write-ups.
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Normally either bit will be shielded by the work during the milling operation. I have go to think that using the wider horizontal bit would yield smoother results with less preparation. That is what I have always used. The vertical bit could leave small scallops.
If you go with the horizontal bit, use a router speed in the 10,000 range or go with the vertical bit. You really do not want to be spinning a 3+" diameter bit a full speed.
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There's another difference to consider - back cutting. Panel raising bits that also make the "back cut" say you a set up and another operation. Horizontal panel raising bits that cut not only the raised panel but the "back cut" as well - at the same time - are available (Somerfeld for example) whereas vertical panel raising bits require that you make the "back cut" after panel raising.
If you get the right set - rail, stile and panel raising bit - they're matched. Getting their set ups right can be a trial and error, time consuming process - so I go with three routers, each mounted to its own router table insert plate - each with its own zero clearance fence insert - and sample set up block. If I need to make another rail, stile or panel, I just pop in the already set up routers, install the appropriate zero clearance fence insert - and start cutting.
Either way you choose to go - DO NOT try raising panels in one pass and For The Love Of God - use a push block - or two and don't stand In The Line Of Fire. It's not just the table saw that can Kick Back.
http://web.hypersurf.com/~charlie2/Mentoring_LinenCabinet/Mentoring_LinenCabinet8.html
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