Raised panel bit set for router


I see that some sets have a reversible bit for doing the styles and rails and others sets have individual bits. What are the pros and cons and which are easier /faster to set up? Thanks
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Individual bits are easy to set up. first you cut the copes and then pull the bit out and replace it with the other bit. Adjusting the height is simply a matter of placing the coped piece up to the second bit and matching the tongue to the groove. That way the rails and stiles will be flush with one another. Beats undoing the cutter. I HATE swapping bearings on my raised panel bits but there's no way I'm gonna use a 3-1/2" cutter in one pass. I can't use the fence to reduce depth of cut on a cathedral panel!
Dave
habbi wrote:

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I

Try cutting shallower and raising the bit to the finished height.
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Leon wrote:

No can do with a back cutter on the bit.
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Oh Yeah..... I knew there was a reason that I don't buy bits with back cutters. Take the back cutter off until the desired depth is reached.
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Precut the angle on the table saw, finish in one pass with a two piece cutter.
Dave
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Could the statement be somewhat bassackwards? Maybe should read:
1) Set the bit to the desired height. 2) Set the fence so none of the bit sticks out of it 3) Gradually expose a portion of the bit and make a pass 4) Repeat step 3 until the guide bearing is flush with the face of the fence.
Precutting on the TS cuts out a lot of the repetitiveness. --
PDQ --
| >> | >> Try cutting shallower and raising the bit to the finished height. | >> | > No can do with a back cutter on the bit. | | Precut the angle on the table saw, finish in one pass with a two piece | cutter. | | Dave | | | |
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That presupposes that one is not cutting a cathedral or other non-straight rail or panel, doesn't it??
Dave
PDQ wrote:

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Leon wrote:

Uh, this is a cope/cove, rail/stile bit. Think about what you said and how that procedure might impact the tongue and groove profile.
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Some part of "raised panel bit" you quoted, but didn't catch?
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George wrote:

Only the part about "raised panel bit."<g> I was following the original thread where the question was
"I see that some sets have a reversible bit for doing the styles and railsand others sets have individual bits. What are the pros and cons and which are easier /faster to set up? Thanks"
I missed David's transition into the raise panel bit in his post. My bad.
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And some sets do all three. This area takes either a lot of experience, or a lot of research, in order to get the right sets and setup.
It certainly seems easier to show than tell.
Patriarch
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I like the versatility of the shaper on both cope/mold and panel raisers. Makes me especially happy I have a shaper every time I do the setup for raising panels, though I once went to another school one afternoon and saw a panel-raising bit installed cutter _down_ on the machine. No, it wasn't a kid who had set it up that way.
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The single bit type is cheaper and more trouble. The 2 piece set is more expensive and less complicated to use.
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Not to mention that the 2-piece set survives sharpening much better. . . . . . . . . . . I SAID not to MENTION IT!!!
This weather has put me in a goofy mood.
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The two piece set can be set up in two simple router table/fence combinations, and left that way, until all of the pieces have been completed. With sufficiently powerful routers at under $150, it's an attractive option. Recommended in Udo Schmidt's kitchen cabinet book, I used it for a prototype cabinet I built last fall. It works well.
Patriarch
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IMHO, you're always better off going for the separate bits.. Mr. Murphy will remind you that you forgot to route one piece, but not until you've reversed the bit, adjusted the router and done about 1/2 of the next cut..
mac
Please remove splinters before emailing
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which
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I have separate bits too. Two bits also mean less sharpening to be done when needed.
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