Rail & Stile Edge Treatment Question

Am doing some simple rail and stile cabinet doors. Want to keep the edge treatment simple - want to go with 1/8th inch roundover. Easy and straight foreward on the outside edges but the inside edges are a problem in the corners where the rail and stile come together.
Am considering rounding over the ends of the rails as well as the inside edges. Have posted the idea and some shots of some scrap with the idea to ab.b.p.w.. The rail to stile is obvious but soft and may be a design element since it adds another shadow line.
So comments, suggestions, opinions would be appreciated.
charlie b
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I would make a sample door and see how it looked. :-)

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I tried that same approach on my first cabinet. 2 of the 8 corners were okay, so I threw the doors out and bought a R&S router bit.
Save yourself the trouble and do it right the first time. It is possible to do it your way (as evidenced by my 2 good corners) but it requires a lot of fussing and practice. Even then, a R&S bit does a better job.
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charlie b wrote:

A slight variation would be to do the plain door and add quarter-round molding to the inside edges. Saves the cost of the router bit set and gets the same look (with a little more work, maybe). Might even save time, since the quarter-round can be sanded more easily prior to glueing it to the door.
C
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Charlie,
Don't overlook the eye appeal of a stopped edge treatment. You're thinking it's a problem when in fact it's used probably more than you think. Dry assemble the stiles and rails and clamp them. Now run the router and roundover bit around the inside edge. The small amount of the edges in the corners that are not rounded over will add - not detract - to the overall appearance. Try one.
Bob S.

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Another good thing to do is stop the profile 1-2" before the corners leaving it square in the corners only. I saw this in a magaine not too long ago and thought it looked ok. I think it may have been a chamfer though.
Jim

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I agree with Bob. I use stopped champfers from time to time and the look is rather elegant. Try it out.
TJB

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scribbled:

I've almost always used a mitre for the joint between rails & stiles sticking or edge treatment. It means that you need to make the stile a little narrower at the end, and the tenon on the rail might need to have different sized cheeks.
Bad ASCII art of a corner. _________________________________________________ | | | | | | | | | | | \ | \ | \ | \________________________________ | | | | | | | | | |
Of course, that's been for making windows where the back side is a rebate. Avoids buying excess router bits. (1)
Luigi Replace "nonet" with "yukonomics" for real email address
(1) WTF am I talking about? Can anyone have excess router bits or any other tool??
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