raid on Gibson Guitar

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http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424053111904787404576530520471223268.html
basilisk
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Hey Bas, Thanks for passing that along. This is the first time I ever read about any type of enforcement of protected woods. Does anyone have other articles about raids at other type of woodworking facilities (furniture makers for instance) where lumber was confiscated? Marc
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basilisk wrote the following:

I gotta ask. What does the type of wood for the fretboard have anything to do with the sound?
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Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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Hey Will, I am not a musician but I experimented with making a cheap vibraphone a few years ago and the types of wood made a difference in sound. I don't know if that characteristic can be applied to string instruments but it exist in percussion types. Marc
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marc rosen wrote the following:

The fretboard doesn't produce sound, only the strings and the metal frets in the fretboard do.
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Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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The sound is produced by the vibration of the strings enhanced and amplified by resonances in the body. The strings are coupled to the body at two locations - the bridge and the top of the fretboard.
The density of the fretboard wood has a direct relationship to the sound of the instrument.
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Scott Lurndal wrote the following:

OK. thanks. I can appreciate that. I'm not a guitar player. I tried when young, but the callouses that I built up cracked and I bled all over the fretboard. It wasn't worth the pain.
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Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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willshak wrote:

Violins don't have frets, but everything that is attached supposedly affects the way the instument vibrates, as well of course as things that aren't attached like a bow.
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On 8/26/2011 3:39 PM, willshak wrote:

my understanding is that a fretboard should be dimensionally stable and resist wear. The wood should be of fairly uniform density, so that the strings will have the same response on each fret. a non-uniform fretboard (and neck) would have "live" and "dead" acoustic spots affecting sound quality. Ebony, rosewood and maple have usually been the woods of choice for those reasons. Ebony is much more expensive.
Mesquite might do very well functionally due to its exceptional hardness and dimensional stability. I imagine that the hardest part would be getting a large enough straight-grained piece. I found these, that I think are pretty cool: http://www.guitarmasterworks.com/gallery_past_mesquite.html http://guitarsbyjake.com/texas_native_guitars.htm http://www.highlandwoodworking.com/woodworking-tips-1107jul/showusyourshop.html (last picture) http://www.guitarsbyjake.com/guitarsbyjake/shop.htm (bass has mesquite top and fretboard)
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willshak wrote:

Are you joking? Luthiers want to know whether the wood came off of the east or the west side of the tree. There are some banjo bridges being made out of wood salvaged from shipwrecks in Lake Superior that go for quite alot (don't have the figure off hand). No kidding.
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"Bill" wrote in message

There are whole guitars being made of wood that has been submerged in swamps for thousands of years.
http://www.guitars.co.nz/ancient_story.html
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On 8/30/2011 2:37 PM, DGDevin wrote:

Isn't the method of delivery of wood in Cremona (via waterborne rafts of same) also suspected as one of the reasons for the tone of the early 18th century violin makers of the area, a la Stradivarius?
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On 8/26/2011 8:28 PM, Bill wrote:

Much of this is, IME, nothing more than figment of the imagination, followed up by clever marketing, much like with the "audiophile" business.
I've recorded albums with some of the best acoustic musicians, violin, guitar, mandolin and banjo players in the world and I guarantee you without qualification that 90% of any perceived "tone" in an instrument comes from the "hands" of the player and makes up the 10% difference.
IOW, Tony Rice can make a Sears Silvertone sound like Clarence White's D-28. BTDT. :)
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Swingman wrote:

I would say that it doesn't make much difference to the listener except for the listener who is playing! I can definitely know the difference when I am playing a fine guitar with rosewood back and sides. I don't own one--but I can tell the difference when I play one...lol.
I will up your estimate, and say that at least 98% of the musicality of a performance comes from the player and not from the instrument. A good player will appreciate a fine instrument even if his or her listeners can't tell the differene. In fact, he or she is likely to leave a good instrument at home and bring a cheap copy on stage. How many Lucille's (sp) do you suppose BB King has?
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"Swingman" wrote in message

No doubt there is a lot of hype, and a lot of self-delusion when it comes to vintage instruments and vintage components of instruments and/or components made of rare materials. As you say, most famous players sound the same whether they're playing an instrument delivered in an armored car or one that came from the flea market. Which is not to say it is *all* smoke and mirrors, but whenever people convince themselves that something made of unobtainium is waaaay better sure as hell somebody will make a pile of money providing the unobtainium version.
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What an accomplished musician can do with a guitar made from a cigar box and a piece of 1 x 2 is revelation.
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Banjo bridges are easy to replace, so that's the first place someone will try to upgrade the sound. Practicing might do them better.
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"Father Haskell" wrote in message

I once heard a young guitar student ask his teacher what should be the first electronic gadget he should buy to sound better. The teacher told him to use the money for a case of strings and wear them out practicing.
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"There are no banjos in Heaven/There are some things even Jesus can't forgive"
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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vQ-NhyctOho

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