Radial Arm Saw? What can they do that a Mitre and Table saw can't.

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On Tue, 13 Jan 2004 15:26:48 GMT, "Leon"

the way I feel about the RAS is that no complete shop should be without one, but that it should be the last machine you buy.
it can be set up to do a bunch of things, a few of them well and the rest of them less well.
where that versatility comes in handy is mid stream in a project when you have all of your other machines set up for something specific and need to stay set up for a while and you need to make that one dado or whatever. takes but a few minutes to task the RAS and you're back in biz.
the rest of the time just use it for cutoff. that's one of the things it does well.
I don't have one yet. there are a lot of things ahead of it on the list.
    Bridger
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Basspro* wrote:

Where are you? If your within a few hours drive and the price is right (and it's the Right DeWalt) I'll come get it.
I have this thing for old machinery and have always wanted a DeWalt.
--
Mark

N.E. Ohio
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Sorry Mark, I already bought from the guy for $40.00. Its probably 20 years old but is square and has a very strong 2hp motor. I just don't have much space for it.

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I have all three. You cant beat a RAS for doing dados, or crosscutting a long and wide board. The CMS just doesn't compare.
Leslie
She's got tools, and she knows how to use them.

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Yep. Hadn't thought about long dados. Good point. There are times when cutting plywoood that a RAS would be nice.
On Tue, 13 Jan 2004 17:54:58 GMT, "Leslie Gossett"

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How in the world do you rip plywood with the RAS? It's arm only moves about 2 feet. Do you just fix the unit in place then move the plywood itself through the blade? I'm confused on this one, sorry, but I'm new to woodworking and especially the RAS.

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On Wed, 14 Jan 2004 06:44:01 -0800, Basspro* wrote:

You rotate the motor 90 degrees counterclockwise for an outrip or 90 degrees clockwise for an inrip. You then lock the motor on the arm with the blade parallel to the fence and at the desired rip width. Make sure the rear of the guard is rotated down just above the work piece as a hold down and any anti-kickback pawls and splitter on the front of the guard are adjusted to the workpiece. Feed the stock held against the fence and against the rotation of the blade. Use pushsticks to keep a safe distance at the end of the cut. Beware of very narrow rips or very thin stock.
-Doug
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Generally the fence on a RAS is set to the front of the saw. This makes it easier to use for most operations. A few more inches of rip capacity can be gained by setting the fence to the base/ column.
The length of fence is limited only by the length of straight lumber you can find or make. Same as a table saw. Except the fence doesn't necessarily extend into the work area, or hang off another fence.
--
Mark

N.E. Ohio
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On Thu, 15 Jan 2004 21:21:33 +0000, Mark wrote:

The fence is normally set to the backside of the front table and held in place by a clamping action between the front table and the back table(s).
The rear table is usually in two pieces - on my saw, a 3" wide middle table and a 5-1/2" rear table. The fence can be clamped between the middle and back table to gain 3" of table space or behind the back table to gain 8-1/2" of table space for ripping. Positioning the fence behind the middle table also allows crosscutting 3" wider thin material than the normal fence position.
-Doug
--
"It's not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the
strong man stumbled, or where the doer of deeds could have done better.
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On Wed, 14 Jan 2004 06:44:01 -0800, Basspro* wrote:

Go immediately to the following site and buy and download this book:
http://www.wired-2-shop.com/joneakes/ProductDetail.asp?ProdID=3&nPrdImageID=&CatID=3
-Doug
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Even better is the Mr. Sawdust Book, "How To Master The Radial Saw"
http://mrsawdust.com /
--
Rumpty

Radial Arm Saw Forum: http://forums.delphiforums.com/woodbutcher/start
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I am glad to see that Eakes' book is still available even if not in a hardcopy format. This is a classic and will remain current as long as there are radial arms saws.
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@newsread1.news.atl.earthlink.net>:

Trimmed an entire house with a RAS and built a cedar planked bathroom on the 45 diag with it also. It did a good job but a PITA to switch diags. Just trimmed a room with a CMS ...what a pleasure.
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Ah, had a tough time with the LH miters on the RAS? Tis easy to do, make an auxiliary "broken fence" fence 90 degs to normal, swing to the right hand miter position, place the aux fence so that you cut at the miter mark and feed you LH miters in straight into the saw.
I've uploaded a drawing of the broken fence to abpw.
--
Rumpty

Radial Arm Saw Forum: http://forums.delphiforums.com/woodbutcher/start
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BUT NO CMS....
The RAS is used only for cut off work..shortining long boards etc... and has not moved off 90 degrees in over 20 years...I will ocassionally use it to do dados since it is much easier to do with a RAS then a Tablesaw...
To me unless the Dewalt RAS is selling for less then a tank of gasoline and you have room for it in your shop I honestly would PASS... I thought about replacing my RAS with a CMS but honestly I have not come up with any reason to .... TODAY if I were a young man justr setting up shop I would have a CMS instead of the RAS BUT I sure would not go out and buy a RAS if I already had a CMS...
Just my opinion...
Bob GRiffiths
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For a bit more than the price of a tank of gasoline, on abpw, a moulding in maple recently made on the RAS.
--
Rumpty

Radial Arm Saw Forum: http://forums.delphiforums.com/woodbutcher/start
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Thanks Bob for the info and advice. I did buy it for $40. Its such an old Dewalt that it doesn't have the Dewalt colors that Dewalt sells by now. Its more of a tannish dark yellow instead of the bright yellow. However this seems to be a good saw and it'll probably hardly get used but when I need it it'll be there.

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Do you know what model number it is? How many amps the motor and the size of the blade?
--
Rumpty

Radial Arm Saw Forum: http://forums.delphiforums.com/woodbutcher/start
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Rumpty wrote:

I want to know too.
--
Mark

N.E. Ohio
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