Radial arm saw vs. table saw. Tools for cabinetry?

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I have a Craftsman 10" radial arm saw (inherited from father) that is 25+ years old. Saw is good condition. Since most of what I want to do is furniture/cabinet work and I have a miter saw and hand power saw, am looking at possibly selling the radial and getting a ~$200 table saw.
Also, what tools are recommended from someone starting out. I used to do alot of woodworking years ago in school, but we had all the high power/industrial tools (loved the $80,000 planner they had). Now, don't have any tools except for miter, hand saw, and drill. I am wanting to start making furniture, with first being entertainment center.
Any recommendations or ideas would greatly be appreciated. - Clayton
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I would keep the RA saw untill you can loosen up your budget a bit, $500+. Greg

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Keep the RAS and get a TS also.

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Keep the RA for now. You don't want a $200 table saw. Really, you don't.
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Well, perhaps he doesn't want a NEW $200 table saw. I bought an older Craftsman flex drive saw for $125 and put about $300 more into refurbishment and upgrades including a new rip fence and a carbide tipped blade. What I have now is something far better than the old girl ever was...even when brand new.
If you have the time and inclination to refurbish and modernize an old tablesaw, you can find one for far less than $200 but be prepared to invest at least that amount more for necessary upgrades. You'll end up with something that will rival the top of the line contractor saws from the best known manufacturerss for about half the money.
One note of caution: if you decide to go that route, get one with cast iron extension tables. Don't even look at saws with stamped steel extensions.

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refurbishment
I guess someone has to state the obvious. while we admire they value you got for $425 and some hours of work, its still $225 over his budget, old or new.
Bob
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I have a 29 year old Craftmans RA that I am using. I used it to build my own kitchen cabinets, without any problems. Ripped all of the shelving and face frames, including oak trim for all of the shelves.
There are time that I would like to have a TS but don't want to give the space in my garage. Have a drill press, band saw, and jointer and have made it without a TS. But I only work as a hobby.
If I were to try and make more of woodworking than a hobby that I would like to have one.
Al
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My TS broke down a few years ago and I had to do some ripping with the RAS to finish off a project. Ripping with the RAS is one of the most intimating power tool operations I ever experienced. Funny I could cut trees with my chain saw all day long and think nothing of it but ripping even one sheet of wood on the RAS scares the bee gees out of me.

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Frank wrote:

...
< ... but ripping even one sheet of

I've heard and read this a lot...why?
For years while saving for the PM 66 I used the RAS for everything and, in fact, before the jointer had it set up to use the shaping head for that as well. I've ripped a <ton> of material w/ nary a problem. All it takes (like a TS) is a long table to support the work, adjusting the hold down properly and using a push stick for narrow stock. I've never felt it was any more "scary" than the TS.
Now that I have the TS, jointer, spindle shaper, et al., the RAS is relegated mostly to cutoff work, but I would still miss it if it were gone entirely.
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Duane Bozarth wrote:

Amen. No more dangerous than the TS if you use the holddowns, pawls, featherboards, etc. Keep your fingers away from spinning things (old Swedish saying).     mahalo,     jo4hn
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On Mon, 27 Dec 2004 08:33:19 -0600, Duane Bozarth

===================================Well I still have ...and use... my 30+ year old Craftsman RAS ...but I will also admit that the darn thing has not moved off a 90 degree cut in the last 20 years...but I do have a Jig that allows me to cut perfect 45 degree cuts without moving the arm ...
That said... I am really not one to be intimidated...but I do have plenty of reservations about ripping on "MY" RAS... just not as comfortable as using a table saw...
As for the OP... I too suggest he keep the RAS (hell I wish I had a lot more "stuff" that belonged to my dad...) I have plenty BUT now that he is dead everything I see in my shop that once belonged to him just makes my day a little more enjoyable...nothing like taking a few seconds to remember him... ..................... ok I just took those seconds...
I suggest that the OP pay himself ...every single week... if he makes 2 bucks an hour..then toss 2 bucks under the mattress each week...if he makes 50 bucks an hour then toss 50 bucks under that mattress... when the mattress gets lumpy...go buy a GOOD Table saw...
Bob Griffiths
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"Bob G." wrote: ...

Pretty much the same for me <now> as well although for some really long material the RAS is set up in a longer bench than the room the table saw is in will handle w/o hitting a wall so it's easier to use it than to move the TS---back then, I didn't <have> a TS... :(
I'm back on the family farm and having all of Dad's and much of Granddad's "stuff" is, as you say, a treasured benefit...Dad wasn't very much on keeping old stuff for sentimental reasons, though, so I keep finding uses for something I remembered as a kid and discover it isn't around (the old wall-mounted hand crank drill press is one specific item). Of course, the old '28 Chevy truck I learned to drive in, the old Cat 22 or the AC D17 would be nice to still have, too... :)
Also, OP probably won't get much for the RAS if he tries to sell it anyway...
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Do you have details or, better still, a plan??
Many thanks
Malcolm Webb
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Use the same one you use on the tablesaw, less the runners.
It's just split fences at angle. I always tilted my blade, though.

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Thats just about right.... just a simple hunk of plywood with split adjustable fences... IT IS NOT the same one I use on the tablesaw but is identical except it has no runners and attaches to the RAS table with a couple of bolts...
Bob Griffiths
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I had a "runner" I gripped in the fence slot, after removing the RAS fence. That way I had full distance to the right, where the existing fence, if left in place would have interfered, and the full benefit of my tuning for square to fence and heel out.
However, as indicated, went back to tilted blade.
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Edwin Pawlowski responds:

Really, Ed's right. Work with the RAS for now. A 25 year old RAS in good shape is better than a new $200 table saw.
Charlie Self "Political language... is designed to make lies sound truthful and murder respectable, and to give an appearance of solidity to pure wind." George Orwell
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Keep the RA. Save up for a good Table saw. Alternative ...Some schools offer night courses, and you can use $80,000 equipment ..[that one I'd like to see], their wood [you pay for it later] and their advice ...it has been some time you say. My daughter still has the walnut coffe table my wife made at a night course while I was studying to finish university.
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Keep the RAS and read the following book to learn how to use your RAS:
http://mrsawdust.com /
--
Rumpty

Radial Arm Saw Forum: http://forums.delphiforums.com/woodbutcher/start
  Click to see the full signature.
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Looks like a good book, might just buy it. Thanks.
wrote:

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