radial arm saw vs. compound miter saw

Page 2 of 3  
On 7/19/16 12:14 PM, Larry Blanchard wrote:

You still have to hold it down, unless your miter slots are t-track or something. In any case, I guess we're all set up differently and come up with ways to make things easier for our particular set-ups, which is the real sign of a good woodworker. :-)
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

yep, and crosscutting a 96" board on a tablesaw, even with a sled, makes me nervous][*]. In my Dad's shop[**], I'll use the RAS. In my shop[***], I'll use a router to cut the dadoes. We both have cabinet saws, but neither of us have sufficient space on either side of the TS to crosscut dadoes with a sled on long stock.
[*] too easy to cock it a bit and screw up the dado. [**] Basement [***] Garage
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/19/2016 1:29 PM, Scott Lurndal wrote:

I am going to add that when I cut long dado's across long panels, on my TS, I use a helper to insure that the panel stays against the fence.
Do this a few hundred times and you get pretty accustomed to performing that cut.
With out a helper I would agree that the RAS would be easier for some dado's.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/19/2016 1:12 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

Precisely! ;~)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/19/2016 12:14 PM, Larry Blanchard wrote:

Or support the long panel with a "same thickness as sled" strip of wood. I cut 8' lengths of 1x8 lumber with my sled and often 6' hangs past the right side of the sled. I simply put a narrow strip under the panel/on top of the extension table, to hole it up.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/18/2016 10:23 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

Well actually regardless if you are using a TS or a RAS you are moving the work either on top of or under a blade. Having used both for years, starting with a RAS, I naturally migrated to do all cutting on a TS. I kept the RAS until I upgraded to a saw with 48"+ rip capacity, I even quit using my CMS after that.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/19/16 8:19 AM, Leon wrote:

The whole point is that you're *not* moving the work during the cut with a RAS, you're moving the saw. All things equal, it's much easier to move the saw on a RAS than to move an 8'x16" piece of plywood, sideways, on s TS.
This concept is proven by the growing popularity of track saws, no?
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/19/2016 11:07 AM, -MIKE- wrote:

True, but with proper set up, cutting that on a TS repeatedly might be faster on a TS. You do have to be more careful but my wife and I do dado cuts on wide panels on the TS with just about every job I do. And I hardly give her any instructions except to push on the end of the panel to insure constant square contact with the fence.
Doing with only one person would absolutely put me in the RAS camp but my previous RAS could not do dado's as long as what I do with my TS.

with a track saw. ;~)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 18 Jul 2016 17:21:15 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) wrote:

I'd rather use a router but that's just me.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/18/16 8:29 PM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

For that particular operation, I would probably go to my router and my dado jig. I would have it done in the time it took me to put the dado stack on my RAS and set the height properly. However, if I had a bunch to do, I might go with the RAS for the horsepower and better dust collection, plus i could set up some stops for repeated cuts.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/18/2016 12:21 PM, Scott Lurndal wrote:

Not a problem at all, I was not wanting to get in to which is better debate and I am glad that it did not go there. But as some of my pictures showed, 24" long dado's would be pretty tough on most RAS's.
FWIW that 50+" to the right of the blade doubles as a workbench surface for me. ;~)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 18 Jul 2016 14:58:33 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) wrote:

My choice would be a router
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Friday, July 15, 2016 at 5:19:16 PM UTC-7, Just Wondering wrote:

With the right attachments, a radial arm saw can do planing and act as horizontal borer, neither of which is a table saw capability,
As a one-man crosscut saw, the RAS can be replaced with cheap (and light) miter saws, but not easily by a table saw.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 15 Jul 2016 12:34:06 -0700, Electric Comet

Can you rip on your CMS?

Huh?

I'd never buy one again but I have one (that needs to be put back together).

They're better at some operations than a table saw. The depth for dados and ploughs sets the thickness of the remaining material, rather than the material removed. Since, in a cross cut operation (cut or dado), you're not moving the material, it can be easier to get a good cut. There is a board you're cutting against (cleaner kerf - less tear out).
The downside is that rips are a bit scary, the reason I stopped using mine. If had mine come after me on a crosscut, too. That's pretty scary.
Cheap RASs (including all Crapsman) also aren't really stout enough, though. The arms flex.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 15 Jul 2016 22:36:03 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

If you cut from outside in they shouldn't come after you. That problem is inherent on RAS and sliding miter saws.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Actually, I'd never thought of cutting the opposite direction. It makes sense, though it makes setup a rather clumbsy operation on a RAS. A slider is even worse.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/16/2016 10:39 AM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I skim the surface on the way out, and lower on the way in. Easier to do on a slider since you don't have to crank it down.
But on wood cuts that don't matter I just make a cut going in.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

We talking about push instead of pull? If so, the work piece isn't being held firmly by the fence. Instead, the blade is trying to pick up the front edge; if it does, things could get nasty. Better to mitigate any tendency of the blade to climb by using a blade with a low rake.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

against the fence. A climbing blade isn't exactly a fun time, either. These are the reasons I haven't used my RAS in over 20 years. I have a table saw, so I don't miss it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.