Radial arm saw versus 12" compund sliding miter saw question.

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wrote:

...yah, I own the first iteration of that saw and it's still working well after, oh, a dozen years? You guys are sure geeking the heck out of this topic...it's really very simple and just as Leon, and myself, have described.
Now, let's get something done, eh?
cg

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There are several posters here that seem to know a lot about this or that subject, according to what they have read from a source that may be way outdated.
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On Sun, 6 Dec 2009 19:00:24 -0600, the infamous "Leon"

First we had Chinglish. Get a load of this Germglish. Cute, but not on a $700 chop saw, thanks. "Open the screws."

-- Follow the path of the unsafe, independent thinker. Expose your ideas to the dangers of controversy. Speak your mind and fear less the label of 'crackpot' than the stigma of conformity. And on issues that seem important to you, stand up and be counted at any cost. -- Thomas J. Watson
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Snip

Festool is like "Crack". Once you toush it you can't leave it alone. ;~)
I just tried out their 75mm Circular saw and track. Swaeeeeeeeeeet
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Leon wrote:

Let go of the trigger and back away slowly from the Festool!
--
"Even if your wife is happy but you're unhappy, you're still happier
than you'd be if you were happy and your wife was unhappy." - Red Green
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Steve Turner wrote:

Too late ... I was there, but he was hooked already.
BTW, Leon would make a helluva drug dealer, now I'm hooked too!
Just like I told my kids, be careful who you hang out with!
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I just got the Festool Trion jigsaw in the mail today - took one cut, checked out how easy it is to swap blades, cut square as can be, systainer. Sheesh. The first one isn't free, but Festool is definitely a drug. I'm beginning to understand why people buy the older Festool catalogs on eBay.
Anyone want to buy my Dewalt jigsaw? Thing's like new. ;)
R
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RicodJour wrote:

Feel your pain ... my first is a TS 75, guaranteeing the slide down that slippery slope is past the point of no return.
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I just got the Festool Trion jigsaw in the mail today - took one cut, checked out how easy it is to swap blades, cut square as can be, systainer. Sheesh. The first one isn't free, but Festool is definitely a drug. I'm beginning to understand why people buy the older Festool catalogs on eBay.
Anyone want to buy my Dewalt jigsaw? Thing's like new. ;)
R
You are the first that I have heard about buying the jig saw. Glad to hear that it too has as good of a first feelings report as the sanders, saws, vacuums, dominos, SCMS, router, hand planers.....
I don't know if you have the Festool vac or not but if you do and hook it up to the jig saw let us know how well it contains the dust.
It is a slippery slope.
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On Tue, 8 Dec 2009 12:18:43 -0600, the infamous "Leon"

Yabbut, unless you're a millionaire...
You'd think that, at the price they get for these things, they'd at least have proper translations for the manuals. The one for the chop saw is 135 pages long. It contains 13 pages of untexted illustrations + 11 pages of instructions/warnings...in each of 'lebenty seven languages.
-- Follow the path of the unsafe, independent thinker. Expose your ideas to the dangers of controversy. Speak your mind and fear less the label of 'crackpot' than the stigma of conformity. And on issues that seem important to you, stand up and be counted at any cost. -- Thomas J. Watson
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Snip

We "millionares" can figger it out, right Swingman? LOL
With Festool the manual is something you read at night when it is too dark to work with the tool. It is not really necessary. ;~)
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Leon wrote:

Far from being a millionaire, but I now own three Festool tools ... and that's going to change, probably again today. :)
I'm about convinced a Rotex is in order for annual end of year "buy a tool or give it to the government" exercise.
Festool quality reminds of the 50's "Made in USA" ... but there is nothing like it in the USA today. Anything I consider not an expendable item in the shop will be on the order of Festool, Fein, Veritas, Omer, et al, if I can swing it.
Tools seem to be a good barometer of the decline of this particular period in our culture ... "Made in USA", as far as tools go, is predominately nothing but a crock of shit today.

Haven't had to read a Festool manual yet for operations, except briefly for the diagram that familiarizes you with the various knobs and dials ... operation is nothing but intuitive for anyone with a basic familiarity with tools.
Even the plunge saw requires only a few minutes with the manual before making NO, or hardly any, sawdust. :)
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On Wed, 9 Dec 2009 08:54:40 -0600, the infamous "Leon"

Nuttin' like curling up with a good...manual? OK, if you say so, Leon. <titter>
-- To know what you prefer instead of humbly saying Amen to what the world tells you you ought to prefer, is to have kept your soul alive. -- Robert Louis Stevenson
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Quite true as long as you dismiss planing, molding, routing, using a flex shaft, drilling, polishing, et.
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So a Shopsmith might be even better? (Except for the price)
Max
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On Thu, 3 Dec 2009 21:28:49 -0700, the infamous "Max"

IMHSHO, discrete tools always beat the combos, especially if you need to do two different setups at a time. My buddy with the Shopsmith curses that he has to tear down one setup to do another one. Going from station to station is _always_ better, given room.
-- Follow the path of the unsafe, independent thinker. Expose your ideas to the dangers of controversy. Speak your mind and fear less the label of 'crackpot' than the stigma of conformity. And on issues that seem important to you, stand up and be counted at any cost. -- Thomas J. Watson
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wrote:

I am the original poster of this question. I have a Grizzly G0444Z TS, a 10" miter saw, and sears RAS. My intentions were now to sell my recently bought RAS and 10" MS and buy the Craftman 12" SCMS which is on sale at Sears. What I really want to do is free up some space in my shop by getting rid of the RAS and hope to buy a drum sander to put in the space where the RAS now is. That's why I asked the question would I be losing anything by getting the scms. The only difference I see is not being able to rip. I have other means to do the other things an ras offers. Thanks again for your opinions.
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The one big reason I would not get rid of my RAS is for cross cutting dados in long pieces. There are several ways to accomplish this task without a RAS but I prefer the RAS. I doubt a SCMS could perform that task well or with repeatability.
Gordon Shumway
Our Constitution needs to be used less as a shield for the guilty and more as a sword for the victim.
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Unless you were doing pieces on a regular basis, a router could handle doing the dados over long pieces. Some of them even have a provision for a fence to keep the router parallel to the reference edge.
Puckdropper
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Yeah, I hear you. I kept a RAS around for years taking up space for just that purpose. Finally got rid of the darn thing and use a router with jig to do cross-cut dados in long boards. A little slower but not a big deal. I don't miss it at all and put the space to much better use.. -Jim
Gordon Shumway wrote:

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